Center for Interventional Oncology

Photo Gallery

Chronic pain sufferer Beatrice Bowie.
Dr. Bradford Wood demonstrates remote-controlled robotic needle insertion to a predetermined target.
 
Procedure underway
During medical GPS (fusion imaging)-guided tumor ablation, pre-procedural PET, MRI and/or CT scan are fused (registered) to ultrasound for real-time mutli-modality feedback on needle position during treatment.
 
Real-time mutli-modality feedback
During medical GPS (fusion imaging)-guided tumor ablation, pre-procedural PET, MRI and/or CT scan are fused (registered) to ultrasound for real-time mutli-modality feedback on needle position during treatment.
 
Pre-procedural PET, MRI and/or CT scan are fused (registered)
During medical GPS (fusion imaging)-guided tumor ablation, pre-procedural PET, MRI and/or CT scan are fused (registered) to ultrasound for real-time mutli-modality feedback on needle position during treatment.
 
Another shot of procedure
During medical GPS (fusion imaging)-guided tumor ablation, pre-procedural PET, MRI and/or CT scan are fused (registered) to ultrasound for real-time mutli-modality feedback on needle position during treatment.
 
Interventional radiology’s stereotactic frame is attached to a CT-gantry with hanging tools
Interventional radiology's stereotactic frame is attached to a CT-gantry with hanging tools, including a robot; medical GPS (electromagnetic tracking or fusion image guidance); and high-intensity, focused-ultrasound (noninvasive tissue destruction or drug delivery).
 
Rotational angiography in the foreground and CT-based tools in the background
The "operating room of the future" includes rotational angiography in the foreground and CT-based tools in the background.
 
Dr. Bradford Wood
Dr. Bradford Wood is chief of the Center for Interventional Oncology.
 
High-intensity, focused ultrasound; medical GPS; and a robot
From left to right, in foreground, are high-intensity, focused ultrasound; medical GPS; and a robot (for automated, point-and-click needle placement).
 
Dr. Bradford Wood uses a radiofrequency generator
Dr. Bradford Wood uses a radiofrequency generator for thermal ablation of tumors (lower right) and a magnetic field generator (the "satellite" of medical GPS, on left).
 
Procedure space for minimally invasive, image-guided therapy
Shown is the procedure space for minimally invasive, image-guided therapy, in which imaging feedback during procedures may improve treatments.
 
Working space of the low-field magnetic generator
The working space of the low-field magnetic generator is 500mm cubed. This device glues multiple imaging modalities together.
 
Drs. Bradford Wood (left) and Peter Pinto
Drs. Bradford Wood (left) and Peter Pinto complete a pre-procedural selection of MRI targets.
 
An engineer tunes software for a procedure.
An engineer, part of an academic-industry-government cooperative research and development agreement, tunes software for a procedure.
 
Physicians use multi-modality imaging feedback during the prostate fusion biopsy
Physicians use multi-modality imaging feedback during the prostate fusion biopsy to precisely place needles to predetermined targets.
 
Dr. Peter Pinto (left) is a surgical liaison
Multi-disciplinary collaborations require close communication and lack of disciplinary barriers, leveraging the unique translational environment of the NIH Intramural Research Program. Dr. Peter Pinto (left) is a surgical liaison for the Center for Interventional Oncology.
 
Real-time mutli-modality feedback
Close collaborations enable new perspectives on procedural medicine.
 
An ultrasound transducer
An ultrasound transducer with electromagnetically tracked sensors images the prostate during procedure with real-time feedback from pre-procedural imaging (MRI), which has been glued (registered) to the patient and to the ultrasound.
 
Fifty years ago open heart surgery was pioneered
In 1955, open heart surgery was performed at the NIH Clinical Center using an ice bath and heart bypass.
 
Today percutaneous (with small incisions) devices are used to deliver high-dose regional chemotherapy
Today percutaneous (with small incisions) devices are used to deliver high-dose regional chemotherapy to where it is needed. The chemotherapy is filtered outside the body on bypass before clean blood is returned to the patient, which limits systemic side effects and maximizes drug delivery to the disease location.

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This page last updated on 06/13/2017

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