Department of Transfusion Medicine

6th Annual Red Cell Genotyping Symposium

Immunohematology & Blood Transfusion

The NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine (DTM), along with the BloodCenter of Wisconsin, co-hosted the 6th annual Red Cell Genotyping Symposium Sept. 21 on the campus of NIH. The symposium, titled "Clinical Steps", reviewed the laboratory aspects and clinical benefits of red cell genotyping in patients and blood donors, contributing to patient safety. Dr. Bill Flegel, chief of the Laboratory Services Section of DTM, served as one of the moderators.

The impact of immunization by red blood cells on mortality of patients with sickle cell disease was presented along with clinical vignettes incorporating molecular studies to prevent morbidity and mortality. Other topics included the role of professional societies in setting red cell genotyping policies, cost effectiveness of red cell genotyping, the Australian perspective on red cell genotyping and the impact of whole genome sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy based blood group and gene copy number testing.

The scientific program was composed by Dr. Gregory A. Denomme of BloodCenter of Wisconsin and Dr. Willy A. Flegel of the NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine.
The scientific program was composed by Dr. Gregory A. Denomme of BloodCenter of Wisconsin and Dr. Willy A. Flegel of the NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine.
Dr. William J. Lane of Brigham and Woman's Hospital, Boston discusses the impact of whole genome sequencing on red cell genotyping.
Dr. William J. Lane of Brigham and Woman's Hospital, Boston discusses the impact of whole genome sequencing on red cell genotyping.

The symposium concluded with a presentation by Dr. Michael P. Busch, Director of Blood Systems Research Institute, on a study by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) titled REDS-III red blood cell -omics. According to the NHLBI website, "the study explores blood donor genetic factors that may affect red blood cells and lead to increased or decreased susceptibility to certain stressors, ultimately impacting blood storage ability."

35th Annual Immunohematology & Blood Bank Symposium

The NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine and the American Red Cross co-hosted the 35th Annual Immunohematology & Blood Bank Symposium Sept. 22. Over 200 people gathered in Masur Auditorium to learn about recent developments, current practices, controversies and laboratory management issues relative to transfusion medicine.

At the symposium, Dr. Edward L. Snyder, a Professor of Laboratory Medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital, received the Richard J. Davey Lectureship Award from symposium directors. The award is given to an individual whose contributions have significantly advanced the field of transfusion medicine.

For more information please visit: http://www.cc.nih.gov/dtm/

Dr. Harvey J. Alter of the NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine presents the Richard J. Davey  Award to Dr. Edward L. Snyder of Yale-New Haven Hospital.
Dr. Harvey J. Alter (right) of the NIH Clinical Center Department of Transfusion Medicine presents the Richard J. Davey Award to Dr. Edward L. Snyder (left) of Yale-New Haven Hospital.

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This page last updated on 06/14/2017

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