Critical Care Medicine Department

Alumni Reflections

Margaret M. Parker, MD, FCCM

Margaret M. Parker, MD, FCCM
President, SCCM, 2004
Chief, Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, SUNY-Stony Brook, 1991 – present

I went to the NIH in 1980 after completing my residency in Internal Medicine. Within 6 months, three of the four physicians in the ICU at the time had left. Dr. Parrillo took over as Chief of the Critical Care Medicine Department and established a strong academic fellowship. I was the first "fellow". I stayed at the NIH until 1991. During my time at the NIH, I learned a tremendous amount about clinical critical care (including a lot about some very obscure diseases) as well as clinical research. Through the academic environment, along with strong mentoring and exposure to some of the most renowned scientists in their fields, I developed clinical, investigative, and leadership skills that enabled me to go on and be highly successful in my career in critical care medicine.

CCMD Position: Critical Care Medicine Fellow, Class of 1982
Current Position: Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Anesthesia; Chief of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Stony Brook University


Anthony D. Slonim, MD, DrPH-NIH CCMD

Anthony D. Slonim, MD, DrPH-NIH CCMD
 Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Saint Barnabas Health Care System, 2011 – present

As someone who completed a residency at a primarily clinical program, the NIH critical care fellowship experience was a particularly important foundation that would serve to launch my academic and research career. Aside from learning the important knowledge and skills to deliver world class critical care to my patients, I learned how to ask questions and find answers to perplexing problems.

From the first day of our clinical rotations, we were confronted with patients who were experiencing devastating clinical conditions, many of whom had failed conventional and sometimes even experimental therapies at other clinical sites around the world. The care of these patients required that the team had an approach grounded in inquisitiveness that not only allowed but fostered the asking of questions and the searching for solutions. This method worked well for common 'bread and butter' ICU conditions like sepsis, shock, and respiratory failure, but also was helpful for more esoteric conditions where the diagnosis may have been elusive.

A questioning approach was encouraged by the senior staff in the clinical arena because it had important implications for the way that we began to ask questions in our research as fellowship proceeded. One of the strengths of the program was how this skill was fostered. Even when faculty members may not have been the content experts in your particular area of endeavor, they were still able to assist you by continuing to help you ask the important questions and search for answers through your project.

Of all of the benefits that make the NIH Critical Care Medicine Department a truly unique and outstanding place for fellowship training, the one that I believe was the most important in my development both as a person and as a physician was the genuine commitment I felt from members of the senior staff in my success.

CCMD Position: Critical Care Medicine Fellow, Class of 1995
Current Position: Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Saint Barnabas Health Care System


Matthew Brenner, MD

Matthew Brenner, MD
Member, CCM Test Committee, ABIM
Chief, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UC Irvine Medical Center

I completed my NIH critical care fellowship more than 20 years ago (1987). My career has been as a faculty member in academic medicine and pulmonary and critical with care teaching, research, and clinical patient care roles at the University of California, Irvine. My research has focused on the translation of laser optical technologies for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The training I received at the NIH Critical Care Medicine Department was invaluable in allowing me to pursue my career because of the unique combination of exposure and training provided by the program in: 1) clinical medicine, 2) clinical research, 3) basic science research, and 4) translational research. By combining these four fundamental elements in a strong and integrated environment, the NIH critical care fellowship training provided an ideal preparation for an academic medical career.

CCMD Position: Critical Care Medicine Fellow, Class of 1984
Current Position: Chief, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UC Irvine Medical Center


Mark T. Gladwin, MD

Mark T. Gladwin, MD
Chief, Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

For the entirety of my career I have focused on bench-to-bedside translational research with an emphasis on the exploration of fundamental mechanistic pathways in both normal volunteers and patients with sickle cell disease and pulmonary hypertension. In one respect I have an almost unique experience in biomedicine, having lead clinical and research programs in both the intramural and extramural worlds. I had the honor of working for more than 10 years in the intramural NIH program at Bethesda, first as a research fellow and then rising through the ranks to the position of tenured Branch Chief in the NHLBI. My work at the NIH involved basic biochemistry, translational physiological studies, and phase I and II drug development, including partnerships with Industry. For the last 2-years I have worked successfully in the extramural world, writing grants (a "stimulating" experience!), building a research institute and leading a pulmonary division with 62 faculty with more than 20-million in NIH grants. I believe these varied experiences have provided me with a broad grasp of the challenges and opportunities before us in both the intramural and extramural worlds.

CCMD Position: Critical Care Medicine Fellow, Class of 1995
Current Position: Professor of Medicine; Chief, Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine; Director, Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine


Jens D. Lundgren, MD

Jens D. Lundgren, MD
Founder, EuroSIDA
Copenhagen, Denmark

Being a curious young medical student, coming to NIH as a Fogarty fellow opened my eyes to a new dimension of how research can be done. Superb training in research methodology – mentors being open to suggestions, but them ensuring at the same time that the research question is good, relevant and focused and the design of the experiments relevantly critiqued. The genuine support and enthusiasm by your peers and how important that is for a junior wannabe researcher ability to maintain focus – a lesson for life as you move up the grades. Meeting similar wannabes from all parts of the world – a source of inspiration and appreciation of the diversity of this globe brought together and functioning across cultural boarder for a common purpose (research of course). Personal friendships, still rooting for the Redskins (after all these years), and a sense of coming home when arriving at Dulles.

CCMD Position: Visiting Research Fellow
Current Position: Professor, Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen


Bettina Lundgren MD DMSci

Bettina Lundgren MD DMSci
Department Head, Clinical Microbiology, Hvidovre Hospital
Hvidovre, Denmark

Working as a Fogarty Fellow at NIH from 1987-89 was a life experience. I made friends and colleagues for life that I would not have made. The introduction to academic medicine and microbiology made me choose my career in medicine. The experience and skills I picked up while working with inspired and inspiring leaders and clinicians was valuable to launching and developing my career. This enabled me to obtain the highly prestigious jobs within microbiology in Denmark.

CCMD Position: Visiting Research Fellow
Current Position: Department Head, Clinical Microbiology, Hvidovre Hospital

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This page last updated on 07/26/2017

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