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Astute Clinician Lectures

The First Astute Clinician Lecture 1998
Poster for the lecture The Link Between Teratogenesis and Carcinogenesis: Lessons from the Wilms Tumor Model

Dr. J. Bruce Beckwith, the first recipient of the Astute Clinician Award, is professor and head of the Division of Pediatric Pathology of the Department of Pathology and Human Anatomy at Loma Linda University in California, and Director of the National Wilms Tumor Study Pathology Center.

Wednesday, October 15, 1998
Masur Auditorium
Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center 3-4 pm

For information and accommodations, contact Hilda Madine, 301-595-5595.

The lecture is an NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series event hosted by the Clinical Center.

The Astute Clinician Award was established through a gift from Dr. and Mrs. Robert Miller. The award honors a U.S. scientist who has observed an unusual clinical occurrence, and by investigating it, has opened an important new avenue of research.

About the Speaker
Dr. Beckwith is responsible for the original clinical description of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and its link to hemihypertrophy, visceral cytomegaly, and cancer of the kidney, adrenal cortex, and liver in children. In recent years, his research has concentrated on Wilms tumor, exploring relationships between abnormalities of prenatal growth and the development of certain human neoplasms.

The Astute Clinician Award is established through a gift from Haruko and Robert W. Miller, M.D. It honors a U.S. scientist who has observed an unusual clinical occurrence, and by investigating it, has opened an important new avenue of research.

About Dr. and Mrs. Robert Miller
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Miller Dr. Miller is scientist emeritus at NCI. He came to NIH in 1961, where he was chief of the Epidemiology Branch and then the Clinical Epidemiology Branch, NCI, until 1994. He was chief of Pediatrics at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima before coming to NIH. At NIH, he combined his interest in birth defects and cancer; and worked to define syndromes with a high risk of cancer, leading to a new understanding of cancer genetics.

Mrs. Miller trained as a nurse in Japan and worked at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima. She was a research chemistry technician in NCI's Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis for most of her 27 years at NIH.

 

Page last updated: February 17, 2010


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