Clinical Center News
Winter 2016

The sweet smell of gingerbread houses fill the atrium

Fifty-five entries in the 13th Annual Gingerbread House Decorating Contest are on display in the Clinical Center atrium. Created by NIH staff, the houses were judged by employees, patients and visitors with paper ballots and on Facebook [disclaimer]. The National Human Genome Research Institute Dog Genome Project entry (below, left) was the first place paper ballot winner and the Ewok Christmas Dogs N-Cats by a team from the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (below, right) was the first place Facebook winner.

Entry themes ranged from recent movies, such as Trolls and Zootopia, to medical-related messages, such as the importance of diversity in the sciences and mental health.

Kari Wheeler, a clinical research nurse and gingerbread house entry contributor, said, "This was a huge group effort! While it was a challenge, it was nothing compared to the challenge our patients face with their illnesses. I hope the house brings them and others visiting joy and comfort."

Dog Genome Project entry paper ballot Winner
The Dog Genome Project entry paper ballot Winner.
Star Wars Ewok Christmas Dogs N-Cats Facebook Winner
The Star Wars Ewok Christmas Dogs N-Cats Facebook Winner.
Yo-Yo Ma, Francis S. Collins, and John I. Gallin
World-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma, who visited Building 10 to present the Annual J. Edward Rall Cultural Lecture, enjoys the Cancer Moonshot themed gingerbread house with NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins, as CC Director Dr. John I. Gallin looks on.
Stories
Dr. John I. Gallin accepting the Lasker ~ Bloomberg award
Dog Genome Project entry paper ballot Winner
#Lisa Krueger and Nathan Swaney
Dr. Paul Farmer, Melva Fernandez Quispe, her father Carlos Fernandez Suni, Dr. Francis Collins and staff
Candace Campbell and her husband and caregiver Eric Campbell
Gabby Nadjmabadi assisting Robert Richardson
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Dr. Nadia Biassou, Dr. Dima Hammond, Dr. Nick Patronas, Dr. John Butman and Dr. Eva Baker
from left to right, trainees Debbie York, Faith Gill, Sayaka Simmons, Joe Shadrick and Lonice Carter and Rachel Perkins
Dr. Adriana Tremoulet
Image of the Cinical Center front
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Dr. Rita Volochayev, a nurse practitioner with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Clinical Research Branch, works with both pediatric and adult patient populations at the NIH CC. She came to the NIH in 2006 to work on her dissertation and subsequently ended up staying upon receiving her doctorial degree. Volochayev said being a nurse practitioner at the NIH is a unique challenge. Nurse practitioners at the NIH have mastered the ability to lead and contribute to almost every discipline at many different levels. The role is a blending of clinical, research, administrative, regulatory, educational, mentoring and supervisory skills. Usually, no two nurse practioners' roles are the same at the NIH. Basically, nurse practitioners function as the primary point of contact for everything and anything.
Left photo: Dr. Michael Kuo,  Dr. John I. Gallin,  Dr. David Bluemke, and Mrs. Anne-Marie Doppman. Right photo: Bluemke presenting Kuo with a certificate of appreciation
Photo of Clinical Center Front
Drs. Martin Blaser, Tom Battaglia, Guillermo Perez and Lama Nazzal
x-ray of patient's upper jaw
Photo of Clinical Canter front
Photo of Clinical Canter front
Dr. Barry Goldspiel