Skip to main content
NIH Clinical Center
  Home | Contact Us | Site Map | Search
About the Clinical Center
For Researchers and Physicians
Participate in Clinical Studies

Back to: Clinical Center Home Page > About the Clinical Center > News and Events
 
Clinical Center News
This file is provided for reference purposes only. It was current when it was produced, but it is no longer maintained and may now be out of date. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing information may contact us for assistance. For reliable, current information on this and other health topics, we recommend consulting the NIH Clinical Center at http://www.cc.nih.gov/.

Published monthly for CC employees by Clinical Center Communications

past issues

September 2005


Poster day spotlights student research experiences

New employees find updated orientation program helpful

Advisory board guides intramural clinical research

Music series hits high note at Clinical Center

Nurses in the Spotlight recognizes care providers

Dorene Dalessandro retires after 35 years

Medicine for the Public lectures resume in October

News Briefs

Longtime NIH barber passes away

Doppman Memorial Lecture speaker to discuss imaging sciences on Oct. 5

Unless print film requested, imaging sciences to produce digital only

Face in the Crowd: Gina (Rowe) Ford Nurse consultant, Clinical Center

New kiosks offer directions and visitor information

September 2005 Upcoming Events


Poster day spotlights student research experiences

By John Iler

Student David Jones describes his research to fellow summer intern-students Jennifer Hicks and Kavita Poddar who also participated in the poster day event at the Clinical Center.
Student David Jones describes his research to fellow summer intern-students Jennifer Hicks and Kavita Poddar who also participated in the poster day event at the Clinical Center.

This year, 1,100 undergraduate, graduate and medical students came to NIH to take part in summer internships in various institutes. The program culminated with the annual poster day where the students displayed their research findings on a particular topic. Fifty-seven of the presenting students who interned in Clinical Center departments proudly displayed their particular topics along with the 530 other presenting interns here on August 4.

Sponsored by the NIH Office of Intramural Training and Education, poster day is a time for students in the six- to eight-week summer intramural research programs to display their results and explain them to peers, clinicians and guests.

“Poster day provides an opportunity for students who have spent the summer working in NIH research laboratories with mentors to share their accomplishments with the community,” said Deborah F. Cohen, education programs specialist in the intramural training and education office. The event, which began in 1991, has grown from approximately 150 posters to more than 580. “In fact, poster day has become the highlight of the summer for many students and their mentors,” Cohen continued.

Sharanie Sims, a third-year pharmacy student at Howard University’s School of Pharmacy, Washington, D.C., and an intern in the Pharmacy Department, said working on her project made her realize she is on the right career track. “It was very informative and gave me a chance to get some real hands-on experience, especially in pharmaceutical economics, which involves costs and savings,” she said. “I never knew what it was until I came here, so I made my presentation on it. I loved it!”

Nutrition Department intern Jennifer Hicks, a graduate student in nutrition at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, worked with Kavita Poddar, a graduate student at the Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Va., and fellow nutrition intern, on the topic of “Nutritional Care Processes at the Clinical Center.”

"It is about how much nutrition intervention patients need to supplement their treatments and their illnesses," said Hicks. "It was a great experience working on this topic and it is one with lots of possibilities," added Poddar. "I would like to return some day and add to this research. This would be a wonderful environment in which to work."

David O. Jones engaged in what he called his first clinical experience. A second year medical student at Boston University, Jones' poster dealt with various topics he had worked with in the Clinical Center's radiology department. "Summed up, everything-and I mean everything-has a direct impact on clinical care; from the types of medicine and treatments that are administered to the meals served and the overall cleanliness of the surroundings," he said. "Even how we treat people factors in. And that has been at the heart of everything I've learned."

Back to Top


New employees find updated orientation program helpful

 Anita Thomas and Jason Saysanlar, both new to the Clinical Center, participate in a cultural communication exercise as part of the CC's new orientation program.
Anita Thomas and Jason Saysanlar, both new to the Clinical Center, participate in a cultural communication exercise as part of the CC's new orientation program.

Every two weeks, a group of 25 to 35 new faces come through the doors of the Clinical Center. These new employees, volunteers and contractors often wear expressions of anxious excitement as they continually look from their NIH map to the building signage and back to the map, perhaps stopping to ask a passing stranger for directions. For their first day of work, the Clinical Center training staff ensure that the newcomers’ first impression of the NIH Clinical Center is positive.

Every new Clinical Center employee, volunteer and contractor attends the Clinical Center new employee orientation. Designed to provide individuals with a deeper understanding of the Clinical Center’s values and mission, the program welcomes new staff and outlines expectations for everyone working in the CC. The program is offered by the CC Office of Organizational Development and Planning and covers the organization’s core competencies—safety and emergency procedures, customer service, diversity awareness and communication, performance improvement, confidentiality and work-place ethics—discussing how those elements support the mission, vision and guiding principles of the Clinical Center.

In August, the organizational development and planning staff implemented a revised orientation program in response to NIH centralization efforts and a desire to streamline training requirements for organization-wide competencies. The two-day program offers a new segment on cross-cultural communications—a key competency.

New employees work together at the orientation.
New employees work together at the orientation.

On the day of orientation, new employees listen quietly as Deborah Gardner, chief, organizational development and planning says, “The ability to communicate across cultures is about coming to terms with personal attitudes, beliefs and expectations about others and gaining comfort with different-ness.” She goes on to explain that with a diverse patient population and workforce like that of NIH, people must learn to value differences in order to effectively work and communicate with one another—an essential part of functioning in a large organization.

After reviewing the competency, Garder asks participants to take part in a diversity-communication exercise. The room is immediately consumed by the noise of people talking as groups form and new colleagues move together asking questions of each other. Following the exercise, Gardner and the group reflect on the results. The exercise raises key issues around communication and requires participants to explore individual and organizational dimensions of diversity.

“This new program helps people understand that partnering has to start on day one,” Maureen McDonnell, coordinator of the new CC employee orientation, says. “This place is large and complex, so you have to start building those relationships.”

The orientation program itself models partnering by inviting representatives from various departments to come speak with the group, sharing their personal insight, and delivering content on topics such as patient safety and confidentiality, emergency procedures and universal precautions. “The program is so much richer when you have all these people and departments coming together,” Gardner says.

“The success of our new employees is the Clinical Center’s success as well,” explains Gardner. “We want to invest in all our employees from the very beginning.”

Back to Top


Advisory board guides intramural clinical research

As recommended by the NIH director's blue ribbon panel on the future of intramural clinical research, the former CC Board of Governors has assumed a new and larger identity, becoming the NIH Advisory Board for Clinical Research.

The board, which meets three times annually, provides guidance to the NIH intramural clinical research program, including CC resources, planning and operations. Members are appointed by the NIH director. The next open meeting is Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-2 pm, in the Clinical Center's medical boardroom on the fourth floor of the Hatfield building. Dr. Edward J. Benz and R. Edward Howell co-chair the group. Dr. Benz is president of Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Howell is vice president and chief executive officer of the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville.

Members from outside NIH are:

Dr. Barry S. Coller, David Rockefeller Professor of Medicine, head of the Laboratory of Blood and Vascular Biology, and vice president for medical affairs at New York City's Rockefeller University and University Hospital's physician in chief.

Robert M. Dickler, senior vice president, division of health care affairs, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, D.C.

Dr. Ronald Evens, senior executive officer, Barnes Jewish (BJC) Healthcare, St. Louis.

Brent L. Henry, vice president and general counsel, Partners HealthCare System, Inc., Boston.

Dr. Talmadge E. King, Jr., professor and vice chairman, Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital.

Dr. Olufunmilayo (Funmi) Olopade, professor of medicine and director of the Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics, University of Chicago.

Vivian E. Riefberg, director, McKinsey Company Washington, D.C.

Members from NIH are Dr. Lee J. Helman, chief, pediatric oncology branch and deputy director, Center for Cancer Research, NCI; Dr. Thomas Insel, director, NIMH; Dr. Peter E. Lipsky, director, intramural research program, NIAMS; Dr. Henry McFarland, clinical director, NINDS; Dr. Elizabeth G. Nabel, director, NHLBI; Dr. Lynnette K. Nieman, senior investigator and deputy branch chief, pediatric and reproductive endocrinology branch, NICHD; Dr. Jennifer Puck, chief, genetics and molecular biology branch, NHGRI; and Dr. Stephen Straus, director, NCCAM.

Ex officio members are Dr. John I. Gallin, CC director; Dr. Michael M. Gottesman, NIH deputy director for intramural research; and Dr. Richard Cannon, chairman of the Medical Executive Committee and clinical director, NHLBI.

Maureen E. Gormley, CC chief operating officer, is the board's executive secretary. Dr. Richard Wyatt, executive director, NIH Office of Intramural Research, provides senior staff support.

Back to Top


Music series hits high note at Clinical Center

By Kathryn Boswell

Ann Brewer plays classical music selections in the CC atrium as part of the NIH Summer Concert Series at the Oasis.
Ann Brewer plays classical music selections in the CC atrium as part of the NIH Summer Concert Series at the Oasis.

This summer, the Clinical Center added another feature to its repertoire of art programs-one that benefits NIH employees as well as the patients. The Summer Concert Series at the Oasis was launched on June 30 with a performance by a jazz-gospel a cappella group, which was followed by a wide variety of musical acts each Thursday from noon to 1 p.m. in the Hatfield Center's atrium.

Employees, patients and visitors listened from their seats or simply stopped for a few minutes as performance groups and individuals sang, danced and played instruments.

When the Clinical Center art committee first envisioned a seasonal concert series many years ago, they were limited by the lack of open space in the Magnuson building. "In the old building, there were pockets of public space," explains Larry Eldridge, senior advisor to the CC chief operating officer and art committee member. "With the atrium in the new Hatfield Center, we saw a great opportunity to add even more life to the building-and to use the atrium for programs beyond the normal business hours."

The idea soon became a reality with the help from the NIH Office of Research Services, division of employee services and Eurest dining services, both of which partnered with the art program to bring the long-awaited concert series to NIH. The concert series soon became a great collaborative effort, with representation from several CC departments and offices, including facility management, rehabilitation medicine and networks and applications. The goal was not only to "create a relaxing, comfortable atmosphere for the patients and caregivers," Crystal Parmele, CC Office of Facility Management, explains, but also to give local artists and NIH employees the opportunity to share their talents with the NIH community.

The series included performances from the ViBE, violinist Charles Tolbert, Premier, the NIH Orchestra Ensemble, pianist Ann Brewer and a group of young Irish musicians from the Sligo Hedge School led by Karen Ashbrook. Each group and individual was welcomed to the Clinical Center with a great response. "The whole program has been very well received," says OFM employee Lillian Fitzgerald. "I received comments from several employees who told me that they had their office doors open and the music brightened their day," Eldridge adds.

For the performers, some of whom were also NIH employees, the response was equally encouraging. Terence Hope, who sings with the ViBE when he is not working at NIH as a conference coordinator, says the experience was excellent. "For me it has been a great thing to volunteer and help out, and to see how uplifting the music was for the children that came and spoke with us."

Ann Brewer, who works in the NIH director's office, played classical piano selections on July 28. "The biggest reward [of performing]," says Brewer, "was when I was walking down the hill after my performance and someone was knocking on a window from the CC. Once they got my attention, I looked up and saw that it was a patient and family cheering me. That made it worth the world to me."

The concert series is expected to resume in September. If you or someone you know is interested in performing, contact Crystal Parmele at (301) 496-2862.

Back to Top


Nurses in the Spotlight recognizes care providers

In July the Clinical Center's Nursing and Patient Care Services' recruitment office implemented a new recognition program called In the Spotlight. The purpose of the program is to inform the CC nursing staff and the NIH nursing community about the professional accomplishments and milestones nurses have achieved.

Dr. Migdalia V. Rivera Goba, CC senior nurse specialist for health disparities and community outreach, presented at the National Association of Hispanic Nurses conference in Orlando, Fla. in July, where she also received the President's Award. Her presentation was "Bridging Cultural Competence: A Nurse Fellow's Perspective." Chad Koratich and Frances Sundt's abstract on "Management of Psychiatric and Psychosocial Manifestations in Treating Hepatitis C in the HIV/HCV Co-Infected Client" has been accepted for presentation at the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care conference, Nov. 20 in Orlando, Fla. The nurses work in outpatient clinic 8.

Dr. Joachim Voss, NIH/NINDS, neuromuscular disease section nurse, is the recipient of two United States Public Service Nursing Professional Advisory Committee Awards for 2005: the Faye G. Abdellah Publication Award for Nursing Research and the Hasselmeyer Award for Research Initiatives. The awards were presented on Aug. 12 at the United States Public Health Service National Nursing Recognition Event.

Lt. Cmdr. Felicia Andrews has accepted the position of nurse manager, 1 NW pediatric unit and day hospital. Andrews received her BSN from Tuskegee University in Alabama and is currently pursing a master's in public health nursing from Bowie State University in Maryland

United States Public Health Service Commissioned Officers' Promotions Promoted to 04: Lt. Stacy Barley (1NW); Lt. Leigh Bernardino (OP11); Lt. Geri Hawks (3NE); Lt. Alexis Mosquera (1SE); Lt. Doris Wurah (5SE) Promoted to 05: Lt. Cmdr. Suzanne Fillippi (3NW); Lt. Cmdr. Beverly Smith (3SWS).

NIH Nurses' Retirements Gail Butterworth (1SW); Ruth Litzenberger (5NW); Patricia Tartaglia (7SE); Dorett Sutherland (3SWN); Josette Desfayes (7SE).

Back to Top


Dorene Dalessandro retires after 35 years

Dorene Dalessandro
Dorene Dalessandro

After a 35-year federal career, Dorene Dalessandro retired from the Clinical Center’s Office of Financial Resource Management in July. During her 31 years at NIH, Dalessandro has been a valued employee in various departments, including laboratory medicine and the CC director’s office.

“I had not been thinking of retirement,” Dalessandro says. “But I realized that it was time.” Even on her last day of work, the numerous flowers from appreciative colleagues and the steady stream of visitors stopping by to give her hugs and best wishes only momentarily distracted her from her work. Rather, Dalessandro continued to diligently complete her final projects as program support specialist like any other day.

Dalessandro’s Clinical Center career began in 1978 in the laboratory medicine department, then known as clinical pathology, where she worked as a clerk-typist and later as a secretary. Eleven years later, she accepted a position in the CC director’s office as secretary to Larry Eldridge. In 1997, Dalessandro migrated into a position as the secretary to the chief financial officer. In 2002, she became a member of the financial office where she has managed office logistics, facilities management, timekeeping and inventory.

Throughout her years at the Clinical Center, Dalessandro formed lasting friendships with many of her colleagues. Whether it was her festive office holiday decorations, her ability to make others feel at home or her close attention to detail—Dalessandro will be well remembered.

“She has always been a helpful, sincere and caring person who consistently treats everyone, whether they are staff or a visitor, with respect and dignity,” says Daniel Rinehuls, chief, financial resource management office.

Dalessandro plans to spend her retirement with her four children, six grandchildren and other relatives. She also hopes to dedicate more time to arts and crafts projects and “do more leisurely things,” she explains with a smile.

“My history with NIH has been a very rewarding one. I worked with very nice people; many of whom have become long-time friends,” she says.

Back to Top


Medicine for the Public lectures resume in October

The lectures, which are free and open to the public, will be presented at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Clinical Center's Masur Auditorium. For details on specific topics or speakers scheduled for the 29th annual Medicine for the Public lecture series, call (301) 496-2563.

October 18, 2005
"Avian Influenza: Preparing for the Pandemic"
Speaker: Dr. David Henderson Deputy Director for Clinical Care, Clinical Center, NIH Avian influenza, or bird flu, is a major concern for public health authorities and is an increasing threat to public health. This lecture will cover what it is, how it spreads, and where we can look for possible treatment and prevention.

October 25, 2005
“Open Wide: Molecular Medicine Enters the Mouth”
Speaker: Dr. Lawrence A. Tabak Director, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Studies suggest an association between oral bacteria and pre-term or low birth-weight babies, heart disease and high blood sugar in people with diabetes. This lecture will cover oral health and the connection between oral bacteria and systemic disease. The speaker will discuss the latest research in molecular medicine and the use of salivary diagnostics as tools for health surveillance.

November 1, 2005
“Growing Older: Challenges and Opportunities in Aging”
Speaker: Dr. Richard J. Hodes Director, National Institute on Aging
The trend toward increased life expectancy over the last century has been remarkable, resulting in an “age boom” of profound implications for individuals, families and society. This lecture will cover research insights on the factors affecting health and well-being as we grow older.

Back to Top


News Briefs

First Annual NIH Director's Pioneer Award Symposium
Save the date of September 29 for an exciting symposium featuring individual talks and a roundtable discussion by the 2004 Pioneer Award recipients as well as the announcement of the 2005 awardees. The NIH Director's Pioneer Award program-a key component of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research-supports scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering approaches to major challenges in biomedical research. The event will be held in Clinical Center's Masur Auditorium. The symposium will begin at 8:15 a.m. with remarks by NIH Director Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni and will conclude at 3 p.m. Attendance is free, and no registration is required. The symposium agenda can be viewed at http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/ pioneer/symposium2005.

Registration for Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research course
The deadline for registration for the Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research course is October 5. The course will run from October 17, 2005, through February 21, 2006. Classes will
Neuroscience Nurse Internship Program graduates of 2005.
Neuroscience Nurse Internship Program graduates of 2005 Front row left to right: Kaylan Fenton, Alexander Ober, Charmika Schuster, Frances McCarey. Back row left to right: Lomar Yap, nurse manager, neuroendocrine program of care; Dr. Barbara Karp, deputy clinical director, NINDS; Teresa Kessinger, nurse manager, neuroscience program of care; Dr. Audrey Penn, deputy director, NINDS; Amanda Funkhouser-James; Jennifer Hunt; Dr. Henry McFarland, clinical director, NINDS; Beth Price, clinical nurse specialist, neuroscience program of care; Tannia Cartledge, chief, nursing's adult, pediatrics and behavioral health services.


be held on the NIH campus on Monday and Tuesday evenings from 5 p.m. to approximately 6:30 p.m. There is no charge for the course; however, the purchase of a textbook is required. A certificate will be awarded upon successful completion of the course, including a final exam. For additional information or to register, please visit the course website at http://www.cc.nih.gov/researchers/training/ippcr.shtml or call (301) 496-9425. An e-mail confirmation will be sent to those accepted into the program. This course will be of interest to physicians and other health professionals training for a career in clinical research. Interested persons are strongly encouraged to take a course in biostatistics such as STAT 200 or STAT 500 currently offered at the FAES.

Participants wanted for smallpox vaccine study
Employees receiving the smallpox vaccination at occupational medical service as part of their employment requirements are asked to consider participating in a study looking at the body’s immune response to the vaccine. There are a total of nine visits, seven visits within the first two weeks at the 11th floor clinic in building 10. Each visit consists of a blood draw, throat swab and skin swab and is compensated. Visits are arranged around your schedule but must occur in the morning or early afternoon. Each visit is about 30 minutes or less. For more information, call Patricia Hohman at (301) 496-8412.

Neuroscience Nurse Internship Program Class of 2005
A certificate of program completion was presented to the fifteenth class of the Neuroscience Nurse Internship Program (NNIP) on May 13. The NNIP, jointly sponsored by CC Nursing and Patient Care Services and NINDS, is a seven-month neuroscience clinical internship for recent nursing graduates. The program is designed for registered nurses interested in beginning careers in neuroscience nursing.

Back to Top


Longtime NIH barber passes away

Cosme Saculles
Cosme Saculles

Cosme Saculles (88), a barber in the NIH beauty and barbershop in building 10, passed away August 1. He had worked in the barbershop for 28 years, serving his loyal customers since 1977.

A native of the Philippines, Saculles maintained a home there and had planned to complete the next of his many trips there in January 2006.

Saculles was married in 1938 to Flora Samera who preceded him in death in 2001; his sister Magdalena Saculess passed away in 1997. He is survived by his brother Sebastian Saculles who lives in Kodiak, Alaska, and his sister, Maxine Longnecker, the manager of the NIH beauty/barber shop.

Saculles’ six children, Teresita, Rose, Linda and Daniel of Silver Spring, Md.; Gloria of Sacramento, Calif.; and Virginia of Germantown, Md.; mourn his passing along with his 17 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Back to Top


Doppman Memorial Lecture
speaker to discuss imaging sciences on Oct. 5

Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir is speaking at the NIH Clinical Center Fifth Annual John Doppman Memorial Lecture for Imaging Sciences on the topic of "Of Mice and Men: Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects," October 5 in Lipsett Amphitheater at noon.

Dr. Gambhir is a professor of radiology and bioengineering at Stanford University School of Medicine and in Stanford's Bio-X Program for interdisciplinary biosciences research. He also heads the Division of Nuclear Medicine and is director of the Molecular Imaging Program.

Back to Top


Unless print film requested, imaging sciences to produce digital only

On September 30, 2005, the diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine departments will stop routinely printing hard copy film of imaging exams they perform. However, the radiology digital film library will continue printing film copies of any imaging exam upon request.

Clinicians who require hard copy films must specifically request them when entering the imaging exam order. All CRIS order entry screens for imaging will offer the option of requesting film. A message will appear just before the special instructions field that reads, "print hard copy film." Prescribers must select "yes" from the pull-down menu in the adjacent box to request film printing. The PACS (Picture Archive Communication Systems) is available to anyone who currently reviews film.

If you do not have PACS access and would like an account that will allow you to use the PACS work stations and web product, please send an e-mail to pacsrissupport@cc.nih.gov.

Back to Top


Face in the Crowd: Gina (Rowe) Ford Nurse consultant, Clinical Center

Gina (Rowe) Ford
Gina (Rowe) Ford

As a mother of two great children, Gina (Rowe) Ford is accustomed to having high expectations. She also applies those expectations to herself, which may explain how she has managed to gracefully balance her time between earning a master's in nursing administration, raising her children, and working full-time at NIH.

Ford came to NIH in May 1991 as a staff nurse and worked in a variety of clinical settings as she gradually moved into the role of nurse manager. "I didn't plan on staying at NIH this long," Ford explains with a smile. "But the organization provides so many opportunities for career development and advancement that you don't have to leave."

One such opportunity came along for Ford after she completed her master's program. She heard about an available position as a nurse consultant for Dr. David Henderson, deputy director for clinical care, in the Clinical Center and applied. "I always saw myself in hospital administration," Ford says. The timing was just right.

"I saw it is an opportunity to gain a broader view of the Clinical Center and learn how departments are integrated," she says. Today, Ford works with a team of professionals whose responsibilities center around patient safety and quality clinical care. Ongoing initiatives include compliance with Joint Commission standards and requirements, working with the occurrence reporting system, and safety and clinical standards. Other responsibilities include support for the consult review committee, emergency preparedness and clinical care departments.

"We look at things retrospectively and try to figure out ways to improve a situation that has already happened," Ford explains. "We also conduct prospective analysis to determine if things will work the way we think they will. Health care is not an event; it is a process. There is always something to be done." Ford says the aspect she enjoys most about her current role are the people with whom she works. As someone who feels a responsibility to the organization, its patients and its staff, Ford feels right at home with her colleagues. "These are people who want to make life better for others-that is why they are here."

While the passion she has for her job may be enough to keep Ford smiling, she has another reason to beam. This year, she married Greg Ford and is enjoying the challenges and joys of establishing a new home with her husband, son Russell, 15, and daughter Kira, 21, who is a senior in college.

Back to Top


New kiosks offer directions and visitor information

Photo by Ernie Branson

The new steel and granite kiosks feature a computer touch screen and state-of-the-art mapping software to help patients and visitors find their way through the Clinical Center.

After locating the desired CC destination on screen, visitors can print a copy of a detailed map. Courtesy phones that automatically dial hospitality staff are also available when additional assistance is needed.

The kiosks have been placed in well-traveled spots throughout the hospital.

Photo by Bill Branson

 

Back to Top


September 2005 Upcoming Events

September 7 (Wednesday)

 

Noon-1 p.m. Lipsett Amphitheater
Grand Rounds
Risk Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Modified Foods

Dean Metcalfe, MD, Head, Mast Cell Biology Section and Chief, Laboratory of Allergic Diseases, NIAID
Monitoring Graft-Mediated T-Cell Responses In Vitro after Allotransplantation for Renal Cell Carcinoma
Roger Kurlander, MD, Staff Clinician, Director of the Molecular Hematology Laboratory, Department of Laboratory Medicine, CC

September 7 (Wednesday)  

3 p.m. Masur Auditorium
NIH Director's Afternoon Lecture Alternative Splicing in Health and Disease
Adrian R. Krainer, PhD, Professor, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, NY Host: The RNA Club

September 14 (Wednesday)  

Noon-1 p.m. Lipsett Amphitheater
Grand Rounds
Hormone Replacement Therapy

Deborah Grady, MD, Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California

September 14 (Wednesday)  

3 p.m. Masur Auditorium
Grand Rounds
NIH Director's Afternoon Lecture Messenger Molecules of Life and Death

Solomon H. Snyder, MD, Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Pharmacology and Psychiatry; Director, Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Hosts: NIDCD, NIH OD

September 21 (Wednesday)  

Noon–1 p.m. Lipsett Amphitheater
Grand Rounds: Great Teachers
B19 Parvovirus: Bench to Bedside and Beyond

Neal Young, MD, Chief, Hematology Branch, NHLBI Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Are Tyrosine Kinases the Whole Story?
John M. Goldman, DM, FRCP, Fogarty Scholar, Hematology Branch, NHLBI

September 21 (Wednesday)  

3 p.m. Masur Auditorium
NIH Director's Cultural Lecture
How Societies Reach New Shared Moral Understandings

Amitai Etzioni, PhD, Director, Institute for Communitarian Policy Studies, Director, Communitarian Network, The George Washington University
Hosts: NHGRI, NIH OD

September 21 (Wednesday)  

9 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Lipsett Amphitheater
Hispanic Heritage Month: Annual Event Kickoff Event
Dr. Jose Tarcisio M. Carneiro, Office of Minority Health Resource Center; Dr. Enrique Caballero, Director, Latino Diabetes Initiative, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School; Dr. Maria Warda, Dean, Georgia Southwestern State University; Dr. Helen Hazuda, Professor, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (Visit CC News online for more details and event dates).

September 28 (Wednesday)  

Noon–1 p.m. Lipsett Amphitheater
Grand Rounds: Ethics
Can Patients Be Involuntarily Detained When They May Pose a Risk to Others?

Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, Professor of Law, Georgetown University; Professor of Health, The Johns Hopkins University; Director, Center for Law and the Public's Health

September 28 (Wednesday)  

3 p.m. Masur Auditorium
NIH Director's Afternoon Lecture Mapping Memory Traces in the Fly Brain
Martin Heisenberg, PhD, Professor, Theodor Boveri Institute for Biosciences, Chair, Genetics and Neurobiology, University of Würzburg, Germany
Host: Drosophila Neurobiology Interest Group

* Some lectures can be accessed on the NIH videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov/.

Back to Top


 

Editor: Kathryn Boswell
Contributing writer: John Iler
 

Clinical Center News, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd., Suite 3C01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7511. Tel: 301-496-2563. Fax: 301-402-2984. Published monthly for CC employees by the Office of Clinical Center Communications, Colleen Henrichsen, chief. News, article ideas, calendar events, letters, and photographs are welcome.

Back to Top

Archived Spiderweb The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.


National Institutes
of Health
  Department of Health
and Human Services
 
NIH Clinical Center National Institutes of Health