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On the Frontline of Medical Discovery

 

Clinical Center News

Published monthly for CC employees by Clinical Center Communications

past issues

November 2003


Accreditation visit to Clinical Center set for early December

CRC boasts new features

2003 leadership certificate series takes the classroom into the workplace

Scientific symposium reflects on 50 years of medicine

Dr. Joseph Gallelli receives Andrew Craigie Award

NIH bids a fond farewell to Martha Kennedy

Celebrating Physical Therapy Month

A Halloween treat

Paying tribute to Dr. John Doppman

Foil the flu

Auction

Important NIH telephone numbers

Use or lose

November calendar


building 10 at fifty

"Building Ten at Fifty"

Building Ten at Fifty: 50 Years of Clinical Research at the NIH Clinical Center, was produced as part of the Clinical Center's fiftieth anniversary celebration and unveiled at the Fiftieth Anniversary Scientific Symposium on Oct. 14.

Written by local freelance writer, Pat McNees, it is based on scores of interviews with current and past NIH and CC employees and patients as well as historic documents and articles. McNees has spent the past year immersing herself in the Clinical Center and getting to know the people who work and are treated here.

"When I learned that the Clinical Center wanted someone to write a brief history for its upcoming fiftieth anniversary, I leapt at the opportunity. Now, a year after undertaking the assignment, I am even more amazed by the place," she says in the foreword to the book.

A native of California, McNees began her writing and editing career in New York working in book publishing at Harper & Row and Fawcett. She then became a freelance writer and editor publishing articles in a variety of publications including New York Magazine, the Washington Post and Parents magazine. She is the author of several books and specializes in organizational histories. Recent books include By Design: The Story of Crown Equipment Corporation, 1997, The First Fifty Years of the Young Presidents Organization, 2000, and Girls in Science and Engineering for the National Science Foundation, 2003.

"The Clinical Center deserves a fuller history, and the investigators and institutes whose work has not been covered here may feel justifiably slighted," she states in the foreword. "Many wonderful stories remain to be told, and I hope to help tell them. But here's a start. For now, let us just say, Hats off to the Clinical Center, the people who work there, and the patients, who everyone agrees, are the most important partners in the research that goes on in Building 10."

For free copies of the book, call Clinical Center Communications at 301-496-2563.

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Accreditation visit to Clinical Center set for early December

The Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) will conduct an accreditation survey of the Clinical Center on Tuesday-Thursday, December 2-4, 2003. Healthcare sites such as the Clinical Center are reviewed every three years to ensure they are meeting the standards for quality of care and the safety of the environment in which care is provided.

The Joint Commission evaluates and accredits more than 16,000 healthcare organizations and programs in the United States. An independent, not-for-profit organization, JCAHO is the nation's leading standards-setting and accrediting body in the healthcare sector.

During the upcoming accreditation visit, Clinical Center staff will have the opportunity to highlight the Clinical Center's patient care and clinical research support processes and programs. NIH-community members may access more information on the Clinical Center's preparation efforts for the JCAHO survey team visit at: http://intranet.cc.nih.gov/od/jcaho/; Non-NIH community members may access the same information through: http://www.cc.nih.gov/jcaho/publicnotice.shtml. Questions related to the actual survey process should be directed to Laura Lee, 301-496-8025; e-mail: llee@cc.nih.gov.

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CRC boasts new features

The exterior of the new Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center is nearly complete, and interior spaces are currently being fitted in anticipation of the late 2004 opening.

When the Clinical Center opened in 1953, press reports touted such modern conveniences as air conditioning. While not substantially different from other modern hospitals, the new facility will have new features not available 50 years ago when the original facility was built.

A main advantage of the new building is flexibility. Laboratories can become offices and offices can become laboratories to meet changing priorities. Also, built in between each two patient floors are interstitial spaces that accommodate huge ducts, venting and cabling, so infrastructure changes can be made without interfering with patient care on the floor below.

An important new feature is a "single-pass air" system so that air comes in one end of the building and out the other without being recirculated. "This will minimize the presence of allergens and the spread of pathogens," said CRC Project Officer Don Sebastian. The air system will also safely permit research on emerging infectious diseases, such as SARS.

Other new features in the CRC include:
Flat TV

Each inpatient hospital bed will have a flat screen TV.
  • Larger rooms - "Patient rooms meant for double occupancy will go from 225 square feet in the Clinical Center to 350 square feet in the CRC," said Sebastian. "Even single-occupancy rooms in the CRC will be larger than the double rooms in the Clinical Center."
  • Temperature control - Each patient room will have individual temperature controls.
  • Light sensors - Many rooms will have motion-controlled light sensors for energy conservation.
  • Flat-screen TV - Each inpatient and day hospital bed will have a flat-screen TV with cable connection. Computer access may also be available at each bed.
  • Physician on-call rooms - Each patient care unit will have dedicated physician on-call rooms furnished with a bed, a desk, and a lamp. Currently, on-call physicians have to find an empty patient room to catch a few hours of sleep.
  • Patient nourishment space - Each patient care unit will have a separate room with a refrigerator, microwave oven and coffee maker for patients to store and prepare their own food.
  • Physiological monitoring - The infrastructure for physiological monitoring is built into each inpatient and day hospital bed. Currently, a limited number of beds have this feature. This allows for much greater flexibility in patient management.
  • Mobile cabinetry - Much of the cabinetry in the clean utility/medication and soiled utility rooms will be mobile, rather than built-in, to provide greater flexibility.
  • Conference rooms - Each patient care unit will have a conference room.

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2003 leadership certificate series takes the classroom into the workplace

To some, leadership is composed of ability, experience and intuition. Developing leadership through trial and error, however, can be difficult and fraught with risk. Making a wrong decision can penalize potentially good leaders and the employees they supervise.

But can leadership be learned in a classroom?

VRC Nurses

CRIS user group convenes

The Clinical Research Information System (CRIS) project has convened a core user group to help with key initiatives. Dr. Steven Luxenberg (center right), the CRIS project's physician informaticist, leads the group. Members are (from left to right) Jennifer Chaney, Diagnostic Radiology Department; Lucia DeMenezes and Keisha Potter, Nursing Department; Jeanne Preuss, Department of Laboratory Medicine; and Sherry Sheldon, Department of Transfusion Medicine. Group members will be involved with training, testing, communications, and process change in support of CRIS. For more on the CRIS project, slated for implementation in mid-2004, visit http://cris.cc.nih.gov/public/ or attend an NIH all-hands CRIS informational session 12 noon-1 pm on Thursday Dec. 4 in Lipsett Amphitheater.

The Clinical Center's Education and Training Section believes it can, and in 2002, in conjunction with the University of Maryland, launched its Leadership Certificate Series of courses for employees and managers.

"I have never attended a class with a follow-up emphasis on return on learning," said one participant, while another called the classes "excellent, stimulating, fun, integrated, realistic and totally engaging."

"Return on learning," according to Stacey Bauman, an education specialist with the Education and Training Section, is a positive change through practical and effective application of what is learned in the classroom.

"We had a great group this year," Bauman said. "They really bonded and this, in turn, provided a rare opportunity to learn from each other." As part of the curriculum, she added, participants shared troubleshooting techniques used when faced with difficult situations within their own departments. "The fact that the Clinical Center administration supports this type of training demonstrates it believes in the benefits that can be derived from it."

The 2003 Leadership Certificate Series, which concluded in August, offered a number of innovative learning techniques. "The Well Rounded Leader Model guides participants through materials and tools to develop an in-depth understanding of what key areas impact leaders and how they are connected," said Bauman. Classroom study comes first, but then participants are given time to apply what they've learned to real situations before moving onto the next session. So instead of trying to memorize a concept, the concept is turned into a skill and is remembered instead of forgotten.

"The series helps staff to understand their inherent strengths and weaknesses, improve their ability to relate to others and to assess their leadership skills and styles," said Kathleen Krisko, an administrative officer.

"Programs like this," said Marcia Smith, a clinical coordinator, "will strengthen the Clinical Center in the long run - especially as the plan to offer parallel courses to upper management is put in place."

"It was particularly relevant for understanding both my own interaction and that of my supervisors," said Dr. Barbara Sonies, chief of the Oral Motor Function Section and director of the Oral Pharyngeal Function and Ultrasound Imaging Laboratory. "The ability to role play and discuss these styles…was a nice framework for the present and will impact my future interactions as well."

The program was comprised of three classes: Development Skills for the Well Rounded Leader; Working Effectively Within and Across Organizational Boundaries; and Motivating Yourself and Others to Meet Individual, Team and Organizational Goals. Employees attending all three classes attend the "Return on Learning" module, which provides individual and group coaching sessions.

For further information on the program, call Stacey Bauman at 301-496-1618.

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Scientific symposium reflects on 50 years of medicine

A scientific symposium, held on Oct. 14 in Masur Auditorium, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Clinical Center. It brought together past and present clinical researchers who reflected on their scientific accomplishments at the Clinical Center. Past researchers who returned to the CC to present at the symposium included former NCI director Vincent DeVita, former NHLBI researchers Eugene Braunwald and W. French Anderson, and former NINDS researcher Elizabeth F. Neufeld.

Dr. Vincent DeVita

Dr. Vincent DeVita, Jr.,
Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health,
Yale University School of Medicine
Dr. Elizabeth Neufeld

Dr. Elizabeth Neufeld,
former NINDS researcher and chair,
Biological Chemistry at UCLA
Dr. Henry McFarland

Dr. Henry McFarland,
director, Clinical Neurosciences Program, NINDS
three doctors

Dr. Michael Gottesman, deputy director for Intramural Research, NIH, Dr. Thomas Waldman, chief, Metabolism Branch, NCI, and Dr. Eugene Braunwald, Hersey Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Dr. Frances Collins

Dr. Frances Collins, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute
French Anderson

French Anderson, director of Gene Therapy Laboratories, University of Southern California

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Dr. Joseph Gallelli receives Andrew Craigie Award

Dr. Gallelli

Dr. Joseph Gallelli

For nearly 30 years Dr. Joseph Gallelli has had his eye on the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States (AMSUS) Andrew Craigie Award.

"Some time ago, my former boss received the award and that's when I said that one day I would like to receive that award too," said Gallelli. "I figured if I worked hard and achieved my professional goals, it might be possible."

And he was right. This month, Dr. Gallelli will be presented with the AMSUS Andrew Craigie Award during the AMSUS 109th Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX. The award is presented to an individual who has had a career of outstanding accomplishments in the advancement of professional pharmacy within the federal government.

Dr. Gallelli has been a research pharmacist at the Clinical Center for nearly 40 years. From 1962 to 1970 he served as chief of the Pharmaceutical Development Service and was later promoted to Pharmacy Department Chief where he served until 1995. Today he is a senior advisor for Biotechnology Product Development where he oversees and advises on the manufacture and development of biopharmaceuticals and biotechnology products for human use.

Dr. Gallelli's leadership, management and innovativeness have culminated in a number of significant accomplishments, including publishing the first text on the compatibility and chemical stability of intravenous medications based on original research conducted in his lab; publishing guidelines and recommendations on the safe handling, chemical inactivation and disposal of injectable antineoplastic drugs; and establishing the first post-graduate hospital pharmacy residency training program, which has graduated dozens of pharmacists in leadership positions today.

"The overall successes of the Pharmacy Department could not have been accomplished without having the best and the brightest pharmacists coming to NIH," said Gallelli.

The Andrew Craigie award was named after the first Apothecary General of the United States who served under General George Washington during the Revolutionary War.

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NIH bids a fond farewell to Martha Kennedy

Dr. Gallelli

Martha Kennedy
Martha Kennedy, a lead special procedures technologist in the Department of Radiology, stepped into retirement last month after nearly 40 years of service to the Clinical Center. But her absence has left a large void among staff members in the Special Procedures division.

"She is one of the nicest people you would ever want to meet," said Bonnie DiMichele, clinical nurse specialist. "Her presence was like sunshine around here. When you came to work, she made you feel good about being here."

Kennedy began her career with the Radiology Department in 1964 after graduating from an X-ray Technology school once housed in the Clinical Center. Since then, she's seen a lot of changes.

"I've watched the ACRF being built, I moved with the Radiology Department from the sixth floor to the first floor of the ACRF and I've watched technology go from labor-intensive x-ray photographic film processing to small portable ultrasound units to filmless imaging and computerized storage and image transmission," said Kennedy. "It was just great being a part of an important service that involves so many institutions and benefited so many people."

Kennedy said she was privileged to work with Dr. John Doppman and later with Dr. Richard Chang. She played an integral part in the development of the CT/ Angio combination interventional suite/lab, a room currently under construction that will house both the CT scan and the Interventional/Angio. The design will serve as a test site and will allow patients to receive both tests without being transferred from one room to another.

"I'm going to miss coming to NIH," said Kennedy. "Things were always changing, there was never the daily grind because the equipment was changing, the software was constantly changing and there were new patients to meet and see every day."

Kennedy will spend her retirement years in her home town of Lake Winnipesaukee, NH, where she will sail and work on remodeling her home.

"She was the perfect employee," said Dr. Chang. "If you ask anyone in this department about Martha everyone would tell you that she was wonderful and did a good job. She was knowledgeable in her field and worked well with the patients. She is the reason the Department of Radiology has a good reputation and is known for its goodwill throughout NIH."

 


Celebrating Physical Therapy Month

CDR Smith
CDR Smith demonstrates to Clinical Center Director John Gallin the uses of the pedometer and how it will motivate individuals to walk and exercise more.
The Physical Therapy Section of the Rehabilitation Medicine Department and the Clinical Nutrition Service, Dietary Services sponsored a Fitness Fair last month to celebrate Physical Therapy Month. "We want to make people aware of the risks of being obese and encourage people to start some type of activity to decrease sedentary activities," said CDR Michaele Smith, education coordinator, Physical Therapy Service. During the fair, employees were encouraged to have the Body Mass Index tested. Those with BMIs greater or equal to 25 received pedometers as an incentive to begin an exercise program.

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A Halloween treat

Halloween Treat

Representatives from the National Confectioners Association, Vienna, Va., which represents candy and chocolate manufacturers nationwide, visited the Clinical Center recently in costume to pass out Halloween candy. "We have been receiving candy from the association for more than three years and they began delivering the candy in person last year," said Lauren Wood, M.D., a principal investigator for NCI's HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch. "They brought a lot of smiles to the children, who clearly enjoyed the visit."

The candy was distributed to all pediatric units, including POB (oncology) and HAMB (HIV/AIDS) on OP13, as well as to patients from other ICs on 13W, and units at the Children's Inn.

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Paying tribute to Dr. John Doppman

Tribute to Dr. Doppman
NIH Director Dr. Elias Zerhouni presented the Third Annual John Doppman Memorial Lecture last month. His lecture, entitled "Imaging Research Trends and 21st Century Needs," can be accessed on the NIH Videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov.

The Doppman lecture pays tribute to its namesake who was a remarkable member of the NIH clinical Research community.

Dr. John Doppman, chief of the CC Diagnostic Radiology Department for 26 years, died of cancer in August 2000 at the Clinical Center. During his 36 years as a diagnostic and interventional radiologist, Dr. Doppman developed, refined, and performed numerous semi-surgical, radiologic procedures - including angiography, visualization and treatment of vascular malformations of the spinal cord; and techniques for locating ectopic or elusive glandular tumors. Many of these techniques are now standard practice in medical centers worldwide.

Dr. Doppman also served as a mentor to many research radiologists of the next generation.

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Foil the flu

Foil the flu Vaccinations will be given in the Occupational Medical Service offices, 10/6C306, and will be given based on the first letter of the employee’s last name. The program is for NIH employees only. An NIH photo identification card must be presented. Contractors are not permitted to receive the flu vaccination through this program. The following schedule can be accessed at www.nih.gov/od/ors/ds/flu. Foil the flu

On Campus: Building 10/6c306

First Letter Last Name

A,B
C,D
E,F
G,H
I,J,K
L,M
N,O,P,Q
R,S
T,U,V
W,X,Y,Z
A,B,C,D
E,F,G,H
I,J,K,L,M
N,O,P
Q,R,S
T,U,V
W,X,Y,Z

Open-Any Letter
Open-Any Letter
Open-Any Letter

 

Date

Thur. Nov. 6
Fri. Nov. 7
Mon. Nov. 10
Wed. Nov. 12
Thur. Nov. 13
Fri. Nov. 14
Mon. Nov. 17
Tue. Nov. 18
Wed. Nov. 19
Thur. Nov. 20
Fri. Nov. 21
Mon. Nov. 24
Tue. Nov. 25
Wed. Nov. 26
Mon. Dec. 1
Tue. Dec. 2
Wed. Dec. 3

Wed. Dec. 10
Thur. Dec. 11
Fri. Dec. 12

 

Morning

7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.

7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.
7:30-11 a.m.

 

Afternoon

1-2 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-2 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-2 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.

1-3:30 p.m.
1-2 p.m.
1-3:30 p.m.


Beginning December 15, influenza vaccinations will be by appointment only.
Call OMS at x64411 to make an appointment.

Off Campus Sites

Location

Poolesville
Rockledge I, Rm 5054
EPN, Rm 103
NSC, Conf. Rm. D

 

Date

Tue. Nov. 4
Fri. Dec. 5
Mon. Dec. 8
Tue. Dec. 9

 

Morning

8:30-11 a.m.
8:30-11 a.m.
8:30-11 a.m.
8:30-11 a.m.

 

Afternoon

1-3 p.m.
1-3 p.m.
1-3 p.m.
1-3 p.m.

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Auction

The Department of Laboratory Medicine needs volunteers and donations for their 31st Annual Holiday Fundraiser. There will be a white elephant sale, bake sale, pizza and a silent auction. All proceeds will help the Patient Emergency Fund and the Friends of the Clinical Center. All items are tax deductible.

When: Friday December 5, 2003

Where: Bldg.10, Room 2C310, (library/conference room)

Time:

9 a.m. Bake sale, coffee, tea and more to eat
10 a.m. Silent auction and white elephant sale begins
11:30 a.m. Pizza for lunch
2 p.m. Silent auction ends

To make donations or to volunteer contact Sheila Barrett 301-436-5668 or Norma Ruschell 301-496-4475

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Important NIH Telephone Changes

Telephone dialing changes at the NIH will become effective on Monday, December 1, 2003. Changes that will affect most employees include:

  • No more five-digit dialing - as a result of increasing demands for telephone numbers, all Health and Human Services (HHS) operating divisions will be required to dial all ten digits when placing a call to another HHS number in the Rockville/Bethesda area.
  • Must use full ten-digit dialing - you must use the full 10 digits 301-594-XXXX for HHS numbers in the Rockville/Bethesda area. The same dialing rule applies to the following exchanges: 402, 435, 443, 451, 594, and 827.
  • Voice mailboxes will change from five-digits to ten-digits; however you can use a password with a minimum of 5-digits.
  • Dialing of non-HHS numbers remains the same - local domestic calls: eleven digits (dial 9 for an outside line + the 10-digit telephone number; long distance domestic calls: twelve digits (dial 9 for an outside line + 1 + the full 10-digit telephone number).

For more information visit: http://www.cit.nih.gov/dnst/DNSTweb/telephone.html or contact the NIH Help Desk at 301-496-4357.

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Use or lose

Employees and supervisors are jointly responsible for ensuring that any "Use or Lose" leave is officially scheduled or rescheduled for use during the remainder of the leave year before Saturday, November 29, 2003. In spite of planning, circumstances sometimes arise that prevent employees from taking previously approved leave. If this occurs and the employee's excess leave is forfeited due to sickness, an administrative error or an exigency of public business, the leave may be restored. Contact your administrative officer for more information.

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November Calendar

5
Grand Rounds
12-1 p.m.

New Insights Into the Treatment of Hypereosinophilia Syndromes: Molecular and Clinical Studies
Cynthia Dunbar, M.D., Senior Investigator, Hematology Branch, NHLBI
Amy Klion, M.D., Staff Clinician, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, NIAID

12
Grand Rounds
12 -1 p.m.

Contemporary Clinical Medicine: Great Teachers Cancer, Ulcer, and Helicobacter: To Have or to Have Not?
Martin J. Blaser, M.D., King Professor and Chairman of Internal Medicine and Professor of Microbiology,
New York University School of Medicine

 

19
Grand Rounds
12-1 p.m.
Masur Auditorium

50th Anniversary Celebration of Clinical Research
Clinical Proteomics: The Next Revolution in Molecular Medicine

Lance Liotta, M.D., Ph.D., Chief, Laboratory of Pathology, NCI

Lymphoma: A Mirror of the Normal Immune System
Elaine Jaffe, M.D., Chief, Hematopathology Section
Deputy Chief, Laboratory of Pathology, CCR, NCI

26
No Grand Rounds
Thanksgiving Holiday

 

Lectures can be accessed on the NIH Videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov

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Editor: Tanya C. Brown
Contributing writers: Dianne Needham, John Iler, Colleen Henrichsen
 

Clinical Center News, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd., Suite 3C01, Bethesda, MD 20892-7511. Tel: 301-496-2563. Fax: 301-402-2984. Published monthly for CC employees by the Office of Clinical Center Communications, Colleen Henrichsen, chief. News, article ideas, calendar events, letters, and photographs are welcome.
Clinical Center News

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For more information about the Clinical Center,
e-mail occc@cc.nih.gov, or call Clinical Center Communications, 301-496-2563.

Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7511

Archived Spiderweb The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

This page last reviewed on 09/9/09



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