Skip to main content
NIH Clinical Center
  Home | Contact Us | Site Map | Search
About the Clinical Center
For Researchers and Physicians
Participate in Clinical Studies

Back to: Clinical Center Home Page
 
This file is provided for reference purposes only. It was current when it was produced, but it is no longer maintained and may now be out of date. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing information may contact us for assistance. For reliable, current information on this and other health topics, we recommend consulting the NIH Clinical Center at http://www.cc.nih.gov/.

past issues

 Published monthly for CC employees by Clinical Center Communications

August 1998


CC department aids after Capitol tragedy

CC experiences power outage

CRC moves up and out

Hoeg remembered

The Jester's Jingle

Williams chief of new department

Fleisher tapped for ClinPath

Neuroscience nurses

MIS exhibit

Saying goodbye

Dietetic interns graduate

Fellows welcomed

News briefs

 

 

Crisis team

A special team of CC housekeeping aides went to the Capitol to assist with cleaning up the crime scene. While there, a Capitol police officer asked them how they can deal with this type of a situation, and they replied, "This is what we do every day. It is our job." Shown standing are (left to right) housekeeping aides Maurice Butler, Crystal Thomas, Brenda Cotton, and Ray Bowen, deputy chief of the Office of Facility Management. Housekeeping leader Chauncey Buford is shown sitting.


CC department comes to aid after U.S. Capitol tragedy

Late last month the nation was shocked when a gunman killed two officers and injured one tourist at the U.S. Capitol. Thousands attended a memorial service for the slain officers, Jacob J. Chestnut and John M. Gibson, which was held in the Rotunda of the Capitol. Among those involved with the preparations for the solemn event was a special team from the CC Housekeeping and Fabric Care Department (HFCD). They were called upon to remove the remnants of the crime.

Ray Bowen, deputy chief of the CC Office of Facility Management, received a call from a staff member in the office of the Architect of the Capitol, which is responsible for the physical condition of the building. Bowen then requested the assistance of the HFCD and coordinated the transportation of people and supplies to the Capitol.

"The CC was called in to help in this situation because we are knowledgeable about specialized cleaning procedures and quite regularly deal with removing blood from sites," said Hank Primas, chief of the HFCD. "People may not realize it but it takes a lot of skill to remove blood from a scene without being harmed by pathogens that may be contained in the blood."

The highly skilled crew included housekeeping aides Brenda Cotton, Maurice Butler, and Crystal Thomas, as well as housekeeping leader Chauncey Buford, Bowen, and Primas. They were called in around midnight before the memorial service and worked until the morning of the service.

"These representatives of the housekeeping staff should be commended for going in to help with this situation," said Primas. "They represented the CC by performing professionally in both a tough mental and physical situation."

index


 

CC experiences power outage

During a project to replace aged high-voltage cables in the CC last month, a transformer carrying electrical currents into the building overheated, causing a power outage that affected the west side of the building from the B2 level to the 14th floor.

The outage occurred at approximately 12:15 p.m. on July 13 and lasted until 8:30 a.m. the next day. By instituting emergency plans, many CC departments were affected only minimally by the outage. "During that period we began load sharing," said Ray Bowen, deputy chief of the CC Office of Facility Management (OFM). "Power was rotated from one area to another every two hours to keep those areas from losing valuable samples and preserve the temperatures in freezers."

Through the CC electrical system, three normal feeders and one emergency feeder bring electricity into the building. During the outage, only two were in service due to the repair work and one of those overheated. "Any one normal feeder can be lost at any time and there is no interruption in power," said Bowen. "But when you lose two, that's when you start to see problems."

Several factors, including outside temperature, age, and load can affect the operation of transformers, according to Joseph Grenfell, high voltage supervisor with the Division of Engineering Services. Although it is not known which of these in particular affected the transformer, the electrical system that is in place in the CC did not fail. "During this situation, the system did what it was designed to do, it kept power coming into the building," said Grenfell.

"Our system is very reliable," said Bowen. "In most normal designs, power would have been completely lost, but we were able to keep power going with one feeder and never lost emergency power in any area."

The page operating system was used to notify staff of outages, and repair staff worked all night to get the system back up to normal operation. "Everyone played an important role in trying to get everything back together," said Grenfell.

Until recently, construction projects for the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center have been taking place with little interruption to traffic on the north side of the building. That's about to change.

Under the Center Drive realignment project, the existing Center Drive will be moved north approximately 450 feet to make room for the 850,000 square foot addition to the CC. During the current phase of the construction project, which spans from July 27 through September 25, underground utility work will take place in front of Building 31A, as well as road preparations for the transition of Center Drive.

The first portion of this construction will affect the south side of Center Drive in front of Building 31A. Access to visitor parking will be rerouted to Memorial Drive, and traffic patterns in the area will change.

"During the modification of Center Drive, the vehicular traffic on Center Drive in front of Building 31A will be restricted to one-way westbound," said Yong-Duk Chyun, CRC project director, NIH Division of Engineering Services (DES). "Pedestrian traffic between buildings 4, 10, and 31A will also be affected."

Signs, as well as traffic guards, will help to make sure that NIH employees and visitors can get around in the area. "Traffic guards will direct traffic during peak hours in the morning and afternoon at critical intersections," said Ashok Anand, DES Team 6 project officer. "People can expect to see guards at Center and West Drives, Center and Memorial Drives, and Memorial and South Drives."

The second portion of this construction phase, which will take place in early-September, involves work on the northern half of Center Drive. Although during this phase vehicular traffic will still be restricted one-way westbound, the access to the visitor parking lot will be restored on Center Drive, and pedestrian traffic is expected to be rerouted to the south sidewalk of Center Drive.

(by LaTonya Kittles)

index


Hoeg remembered for extraordinary science, caring

Dr. Jeffrey Michael Hoeg, 46, a leading researcher in cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism, died of renal cancer at his home in Potomac on July 21. Dr. Hoeg was chief of the Section of Cell Biology in the Molecular Disease Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

Dr. Hoeg's colleagues remembered him as an extraordinary scientist and an excellent physician, but above all, as a warm and caring human being who was distinguished by his humanity.

Dr. Hoeg earned his undergraduate degree summa cum laude from Indiana University in Bloomington and earned his medical degree from Indiana University in Indianapolis. His internship and residency training in internal medicine were at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri.

In 1980, Dr. Hoeg joined NHLBI as a research associate in the Molecular Disease Branch. He then served as a medical staff fellow and senior investigator before being named chief of that Branch's Section of Cell Biology.

Dr. Hoeg's research focused on the roles of lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and cholesterol in the development of cardiovascular disease. His work on patients with specific inborn errors of metabolism has been critical to identifying key factors that regulate lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis.

Dr. Hoeg served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Cardiology, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Cardiovascular Medicine and Science. He was a member of the Board of Governors of the American College of Cardiology and a fellow of the American Colleges of Physicians, of Nutrition, and of Cardiology.

A commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Hoeg served the Clinical Center as a member of the Options Team and was named to the CC's Board of Governors when that group was formed in 1996.

Survivors include his wife, Nancy Jean Hoeg, two daughters, Jessica Jean Hoeg and Laura Nicole Hoeg, his parents, Kenneth and Patricia Hoeg, and two sisters. index


 

CRC project moves forward

Until recently, construction projects for the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center have been taking place with little interruption to traffic on the north side of the building. That's about to change.

Under the Center Drive realignment project, the existing Center Drive will be moved north approximately 450 feet to make room for the 850,000 square foot addition to the CC. During the current phase of the construction project, which spans from July 27 through September 25, underground utility work will take place in front of Building 31A, as well as road preparations for the transition of Center Drive.

The first portion of this construction will affect the south side of Center Drive in front of Building 31A. Access to visitor parking will be rerouted to Memorial Drive, and traffic patterns in the area will change.

"During the modification of Center Drive, the vehicular traffic on Center Drive in front of Building 31A will be restricted to one-way westbound," said Yong-Duk Chyun, CRC project director, NIH Division of Engineering Services (DES). "Pedestrian traffic between buildings 4, 10, and 31A will also be affected."

Signs, as well as traffic guards, will help to make sure that NIH employees and visitors can get around in the area. "Traffic guards will direct traffic during peak hours in the morning and afternoon at critical intersections," said Ashok Anand, DES Team 6 project officer. "People can expect to see guards at Center and West Drives, Center and Memorial Drives, and Memorial and South Drives."

The second portion of this construction phase, which will take place in early-September, involves work on the northern half of Center Drive. Although during this phase vehicular traffic will still be restricted one-way westbound, the access to the visitor parking lot will be restored on Center Drive, and pedestrian traffic is expected to be rerouted to the south sidewalk of Center Drive.

For updated information on the realignment project visit the ORF website at http://orf.od.nih.gov/Construction/. (by LaTonya Kittles)

 index


Neuroscience nurse interns graduate

Four registered nurses recently completed the CC Nursing Department's Neuroscience Nurse Internship Program, a six-month clinical internship program designed to prepare new nursing employees to provide care for patients with neurological disorders or cancer. Shown front row are the graduates (left to right) Howard Holsinger, R.N.; Sharon Brigner, R.N.; Monica Ptaszek, R.N.; and Jennifer Smith, R.N. Back row (left to right) is the Neuroscience Leadership Team: Beth Price, R.N., CC Nursing Department; Audrey Penn, M.D., NINDS; Mark Hallett, M.D., NINDS; Kathryn Montgomery, R.N., Ph.D., CC Nursing Department; Jody Becker, R.N., CC Nursing Department; and Lorena Gaskill, R.N., CC Nursing Department.

Clinical fellows welcomed

After an orientation for this year's incoming clinical fellows, attendees enjoyed refreshments, mingled, and got to know one another during a barbecue on the patio outside the CC. "The welcoming reception provided an opportunity for new and current trainees to meet one another, as well as chat informally with NIH senior staff and others who will play an integral role in their training experience," said CC Director Dr. John Gallin. "We hope to be able to have similar gatherings more often than once a year because they promote interaction and exchange of ideas."

Hands-on exhibit

The CC Information Systems Department (ISD) recently held a demonstration to explore a new system to replace the current Medical Information System. Representatives from Cerner Corporation, a major systems vendor, were on hand to explain the features and workings of their system. Cerner representative Meg Michael is shown with ISD staff Vicki Skahill (left) and Linda Berry (right).

index

Saying goodbye

Jan Einhorn recently left the NIH after seven years of service, and among the colleagues left behind were those from radiology. As a research nurse, Einhorn worked with the group several days a week, reviewing patient films. "She is one of the most efficient research nurses that our department has ever worked with," said Harvey McDonald, Radiology Film Library manager. Of the group, Einhorn said, "I have never had such a wonderful experience with a radiology department, as I have at the CC. They are always willing and want to help." Shown left to right at a going-away party hosted by radiology are NCI's Claudia Seipp, Dr. Steven Rosenberg, Einhorn, and Linda Freezer.

CC dietetic interns graduate

July graduates of the Nutrition Department's dietetic internship program were (from left) Suzanne Carobene, Robyn Altman, Danielle Rossi, and Courtney Crispin. Crispin, a graduate of Miami University, was awarded a fellowship from Ohio State and will begin her program in the fall to work towards a Master of Science degree in Human Nutrition. Rossi, who hails from Immaculata College, has accepted a position as a clinical dietitian at Atlantic City Medical Center in Pomona, New Jersey. Altman, a graduate of Cornell University, will begin work as a clinical dietitian with the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Carobene, who received her M.S. at New York University, will join the staff of clinical research dietitians here in the CC Nutrition Department.

index


 

Williams named chief of new department

When the assimilation of the Clinical Center's contract for anesthesia services with Georgetown University is completed on Aug. 31, the Clinical Center will add a new department-the Anesthesiology and Surgical Services Department-and a new department chief.

Dr. Karen Williams, who has served as director of anesthesia and surgical services through the contract here since 1993, will lead the new CC department. She also served as an associate professor of anesthesiology at Georgetown.

"Converting this large-scale contract to an in-house operation will save money while preserving and enhancing the quality of care we offer our patients," noted Dr. John I. Gallin, CC director. "The move to incorporate the contract is part of a key CC strategic-plan initiative approved by the CC Board of Governors and endorsed by the Clinical Center Advisory Council."

Dr. Williams earned the M.D. degree and completed an internship in internal medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She went on to serve as anesthesiology resident, chief resident, and cardiothoracic fellow at George Washington University Hospital. She has also completed extensive training with the American College of Physician Executives' certified physician executive program in management.

Dr. Williams serves on the American Society of Anesthesiology's Committee on Surgical Anesthesia and is the Society's liaison to the American College of Surgeons. She also serves as president of the DC/Maryland Society of Anesthesiologists and is a member of the NIH's Clinical Research Revitalization Committee.

index


Fleisher to head Clinical Pathology Department

Dr. Thomas Fleisher, who served as acting chief of the Clinical Pathology Department since last July, has been named the department's chief.

"I am extremely pleased to have been chosen to lead the Clinical Pathology Department," he said, "and am convinced that the future will present many new opportunities. The department will continue to stress our commitment to providing optimal laboratory services that meet the needs of NIH patients and research protocols. In addition, we plan to stress collaboration as we seek to extend our translational research program."

Dr. Fleisher, who began his NIH career in 1977 as a clinical associate with NCI, has served as chief of clinical pathology's immunology service since 1983.

He earned the baccalaureate and M.D. degrees at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Fleisher went on to hold a pediatric internship, a research fellowship, and a residency in pediatrics at Minnesota, and was a fellow in bone marrow transplantation there. In 1975 he joined the bone marrow transplant service at the Naval Medical Research Institute.

A recipient of an NIH Director's Award this year, Dr. Fleisher serves on the editorial boards of Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, and Communications in Clinical Cytometry.

In announcing Dr. Fleisher's appointment, Dr. John I. Gallin, CC director, said, "During his service within the department, Dr. Fleisher has worked hard to establish collaborative relationships with institute partners. I am confident that, under Dr. Fleisher's leadership, these collaborations will flourish and the department will continue its reputation for excellence."
index



Barbaba Saltzman, mother of the late author-illustrator David Saltzman visited the CC in late June and read her son's book to young patients.


The Jester jingles in the 14th floor playroom

The Jester never gave up. Neither did his creator. Neither did his mother.

Barbara Saltzman, mother of the late author-illustrator David Saltzman, visited the Clinical Center June 23 to read, sign, and give away her son's book, "The Jester Has Lost His Jingle," to CC youngsters.

The book, a fable about a court jester's quest for laughter and his discovery that laughter is inside all of us, is a tale of determination and hope.

These are qualities that Barbara Saltzman knows well.

She's spent the past two and a half years reading, donating, and sharing the book at schools, libraries, hospitals, bookstores, and charity events across the country.

"What really keeps me going is seeing the children's responses," said Saltzman. "I love watching their faces as I read to them and hearing their delight in the book."

The Clinical Center was one of four hospitals she visited while in the DC area. She also presented readings at several bookstores and toy stores.

"When I come to a city, I love to actually be able to visit the hospitals and the children, and talk with the social workers and everybody who is so involved with caring for these youngsters," said Saltzman. "They're all really special people because it takes a special kind of person to treat children.

"One of the real satisfactions is seeing the wonderful use that hospitals are putting the book to and what a wonderful role it's playing in therapies and in helping not only the children who are ill, but their families as well, because when one person is ill in a family, it affects everybody."

"The Jester" was written and illustrated by David as his senior project at Yale before he died of Hodgkin's disease in 1990, 11 days before his 23rd birthday.

His dying wish was that the book-and its heartfelt message-be published as he had envisioned it. His message? That laughter is inside all of us, even during times of hardship and illness. He also wanted the book to be given free to children diagnosed with cancer and other special needs.

David's wish came true.

Publishers rejected the book, believing it was too long and expensive to print. But thanks to much dedication, a little hope, and a second mortgage, Barbara and Joe Saltzman and their son Michael published the 64-page book as David intended.

It was released in October 1995 and found immediate success.

In less than two years, the book sold more than 230,000 copies, reaching the best-seller lists of the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, and Publisher's Weekly, among other honors.

And perhaps more importantly, some 25,000 copies of "The Jester" have been donated to children so far.

"It's just so important for me to see that this book does what David wanted it to do," said Saltzman. "He wanted it to help all children, those going through cancer treatments and other illnesses, and even those who are just having a bad day."

She hopes, as David had hoped, that "The Jester" helps children through their difficulties and encourages them to find their inner resources.

While pushing herself to find her own inner resources, Saltzman's CC reading encouraged the smiles and praise of both adults and children.

"I liked the whole book," said Arielle Anacker, an eight-year-old cancer patient. "I liked that he got all the laughter back!"

"I loved the book. I really thought it was very inspirational," said Diane Trivelli, Arielle's mother. "I also enjoyed the rhymes and illustrations."

"I think I will always continue to visit hospitals and schools to talk to children about laughter and how important it is, and 'The Jester,' said Saltzman. "Nothing will bring David back, but this really brings him into the lives of so many people who need him." (by Bonnie Flock)

index


 

News briefs

Interpreters needed

CC patients not fluent in English may have a hard time finding their way through visits here. Volunteer interpreters often make things easier by stepping in and helping with language translations. CC volunteer services is currently recruiting individuals who are fluent in Korean, Japanese, and Vietnamese languages. For more information, call 6-1807.

Scholarship awarded

Surgical Service's Susan Martin, R.N., and Maureen George, R.N., have been awarded a scholarship for tuition to the 1998 Georgetown University Leadership Institute for Health Care Professionals. With the award, granted by the scholarship committee of the Association of Operating Room Nurses, the two will attend a week-long training session covering strategic management skills, financing and developing new programs, cost reduction strategies, ethical issues in an economically constrained environment, and labor/employment issues in the 21st century workforce.

Request leave

Individuals facing an economic hardship because of insufficient leave to cover a personal or family medical emergency who do not want to request leave via the HHS-wide voluntary leave transfer website can now request leave through an NIH-only web site. The employee must be an approved leave recipient under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program to be eligible. Visit http://www3.od.nih.gov/ohrm/vltp/ for more details.

Wanted: fire prevention slogans

As a part of this year's National Fire Prevention Week activities the emergency management branch of the Office of Research Services, Division of Public Safety, is sponsoring a contest to develop fire prevention slogans to be used on next year's NIH National Fire Prevention Week posters. The contest rules are easy to follow and everyone is encouraged to participate. The winner's name will appear with his or her slogan.

Contest Rules:

  • Enter as many times as you like.
  • Your slogan should directly pertain to the objectives of fire prevention and not exceed one sentence in length.
  • All slogan entries should be legibly printed or typed on one side of 8-1/2 x 11 white paper and ranked in your order of preference.
  • Your entry should be original, creative, and unpublished at the time of submission.
  • All entries will be examined by the contest judges, and their decisions are final.
  • Employees of the emergency management branch, Division of Public Safety, and their immediate family members are ineligible.
  • Prizes will be awarded for the best qualifying fire prevention slogans based on originality, inventiveness, and creativity.
  • Deadline to enter is September 30.

Send or fax entries to: Fire Prevention Section (Attention: J.P. McCabe), Building 15G, Room 2, 5202 West Cedar Lane, MSC 2660, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2660. Fax: 2-2059. For more information, call 6-0487.

index


 Editor: LaTonya Kittles


Clinical Center News, 6100 Executive Blvd., Suite 3C01, MSC 7511, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7511. (301) 496-2563. Fax: 402-2984. Published monthly for CC employees by the Office of Clinical Center Communications, Colleen Henrichsen, chief. News, articles ideas, calendar events, letters, and photographs are welcome. Deadline for submission is the second Monday of each month.

top | cc home page | nih home page |

Archived Spiderweb The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

This page last reviewed on 09/9/09



National Institutes
of Health
  Department of Health
and Human Services
 
NIH Clinical Center National Institutes of Health