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About the Lectures

About the Speakers

Past Lectures


Medicine for the Public: 2008 Lecture Series

. . .topics of current relevance presented by NIH researchers


  • What does it mean for a cancer-screening test to be considered effective, and how do you differentiate what is known from what makes intuitive sense in the area of cancer screening?
  • What is new in the treatment of mood disorders?
  • What research is being conducted at NIH and elsewhere to find new and better treatments for asthma, which robs people of the very air they breathe?
  • What is the current research aimed at broader understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury and more personalized treatments for it?

These and other leading-edge medical issues will be discussed at the 2008 Medicine for the Public lecture series. Physician-scientists working to translate science into better health and health care will deliver lectures and take questions from the audience.

Medicine for the Public is a series of lectures on disease-related topics by NIH scientists sponsored by the NIH Clinical Center.

The lectures are held at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Lipsett Amphitheater pdf icon (1.3 MB), Building 10, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Md. All lectures are free and open to the public. For additional information on the Medicine for the Public series, call the Clinical Center Office of Communications, Patient Recruitment and Public Liaison, 301-496-2563.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008, 7PM
"Cancer Screening: The Clash of Medical Science and Intuition"
Speaker: Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., MPH
Associate Director
Disease Prevention
Director
Office of Medical Applications of Research
Office of the Director
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker | Real View Lecture
(Requires RealPlayer [disclaimer] software and high-speed internet connection.)

Tuesday, December 2, 2008, 7PM
"New Insights, New Directions for Treating Major Depression and Bipolar Disorder"
Speaker: Carlos A. Zarate, M.D.
Chief
Experimental Therapeutics
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program
Division of Intramural Research Programs
National Institute of Mental Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker | Real View Lecture
(Requires RealPlayer [disclaimer] software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, December 9, 2008, 7PM
"The Next Breath We Take: Trailblazing New Treatments for Asthma"
Speaker: Stewart J. Levine, M.D.
Chief
Asthma and Lung Inflammation Section
Acting Chief
Pulmonary and Vascular Medicine Branch
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
About the Lecture | About the Speaker | Real View Lecture
(Requires RealPlayer [disclaimer] software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, December 16, 2008, 7PM
"New Frontiers in Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation and Treatment"
Speaker: Leighton Chan, MD.
Chief
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
Clinical Center
About the Lecture | About the Speaker | Real View Lecture
(Requires RealPlayer [disclaimer] software and high-speed internet connection.)
 

About the Lectures

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"Cancer Screening: The Clash of Medical Science and Intuition"
The notion that early detection saves lives seems a simple and obvious truth, but many generally-accepted cancer-screening procedures have yet to be proven effective, and all have associated harms that are often overlooked. Dr. Barnett Kramer will address what it means for a screening test to be considered effective and differentiate what is known from what makes intuitive sense in the area of cancer screening.

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"New Insights, New Directions for Treating Major Depression and Bipolar Disorder"
Mood disorders are serious, debilitating, life-shortening illnesses that affect millions. About one in five Americans could develop a mood disorder during his or her lifetime. The World Health Organization projects that mood disorders will be a leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020. To make treatments work better and find new treatments, we must understand more about what causes mood disorders. Dr. Carlos Zarate will cover the symptoms and treatments for mood disorders and the latest research on what may cause them.

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"The Next Breath We Take: Trailblazing New Treatments for Asthma"
Asthma is a common ailment, affecting over 22 million Americans. Yet, about 10 percent of all asthma sufferers get no relief from standard treatments that work on others. Dr. Stewart Levine will discuss current research being conducted at NIH and elsewhere to find new and better treatments for this disease that robs people of the very air they breathe.

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"New Frontiers in Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation and Treatment"
Because of traumatic brain injury, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate, more than 5 million Americans will need life-long help to perform daily activities. The U.S. Department of Defenses Deployment Health Clinical Center reports that the rate of combat-related brain injuries in service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan appears to be higher than in military previous conflicts. Dr. Leighton Chan will talk about current research aimed at broader understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury and more personalized treatments for it.

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About the Speakers

Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., MPH
Carlos A. Zarate, M.D.
Stewart J. Levine, M.D.
Leighton Chan, MD.

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Past lectures:

2007 | 2006 | 2005 |2004 |2003 |2002 | 2001 |2000 | 1999 |1998 | 1997

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Directions to the Lecture Series

Please Note
Security is tight at NIH. Please arrive at least 30 minutes early to allow time for security clearance and to find parking. Visitors over 15 years of age must provide a form of government-issued ID such as a driver's license or passport. Visitors under 16 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.

NIH Visitors Center Entrance
All visitor vehicles must enter the NIH campus at the new NIH Gateway Drive off Rockville Pike (Route 355). If you choose to park in the multi-level garage (MLP-11) at the NIH Gateway Center, go next to the Gateway Center (Building 66) to receive a visitor badge before walking to the NIH Clinical Center. If you want to park closer to the Clinical Center, drive to the NIH Gateway Vehicle Inspection Station (Building 66A). At the inspection station, your vehicle will be inspected and you will be issued a visitor badge. After inspection you can park in lot 10H, directly behind the Clinical Center.

Visitors are encouraged to use the Metrorail subway system, which has a convenient stop (Medical Center) on the NIH campus. Visit the "Metro" site for information on fares and schedules http://www.wmata.com/. [disclaimer]

Parking - South Lobby Lot 10H
Enter the NIH campus at the NIH Gateway Drive off Rockville Pike. After the security check, follow the driveway to Center Drive. Turn right onto Center Drive. Turn Left onto South Drive at the third stop sign. A the top of the hill, turn left onto Service Road West at the second stop sign. Parking Lot 10H is directly on your right. At first stop sign, turn right and into the Parking Lot 10H entrance. Visitors in wheelchairs or with special needs can be dropped off at the South Lobby Entrance.

Taking the Metrorail
Take the Metros Red Line to Medical Center Station. The station escalators come out in front of the NIH Gateway Center (Bldg 66). Enter to obtain a visitor badge before walking to the Clinical Center.

Driving Directions
From Baltimore and All Points North of Washington, DC
Take I-95 south toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head west toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. Turn right at NIH Gateway Drive into the Gateway Visitors Center.

From Virginia and All Points South of Washington, DC
Take I-95 north toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head north toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. Turn right at NIH Gateway Drive into the Gateway Visitors Center.

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Page last updated: November 7, 2008


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