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Medicine for the

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About the Lectures

About the Speakers

Past Lectures


Medicine for the Public: 2007 Lecture Series

. . .topics of current relevance presented by NIH researchers


  • How important is family history in determining the risk of developing alcoholism?
  • What impact will the HPV vaccine have on the prevention of cervical cancer?
  • What’s new in the treatment of eye diseases?
  • Can chronic pain be eliminated permanently?

These and other leading-edge medical issues will be discussed at the 2007 Medicine for the Public lecture series. Physician-scientists working to translate science into medicine will deliver lectures and take questions from the audience.

Medicine for the Public is a series of lectures on disease-related topics by NIH scientists sponsored by the NIH Clinical Center. Presented every fall since 1978, the series was developed as a means of reaching out to the general public with information on medical research. These free, public talks are designed to help non-scientists understand medical science and appreciate the importance of medical research in our lives.

The lectures are held at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays in the Masur Auditorium, Building 10, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Md. All lectures are free and open to the public. For additional information on the Medicine for the Public series, call Clinical Center Communications, 301-496-2563.

Tuesday, October 2, 2007
7PM

"Alcohol Use Disorders: Old Insights, New Treatments"
Speaker: Markus Heilig, M.D., Ph.D.
Clinical Director
National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 9, 2007
7PM

"The Prevention of Cervical Cancer by Vaccination and Other Means"
Speaker: Douglas Lowy, M.D.
Chief, Laboratory of Cellular Oncology
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 16, 2007
7PM

"From Childhood Blindness to Age-related Macular Degeneration: Genes, Eye Disease, and Prospects for Therapy"
Speaker: Paul Sieving, M.D., Ph.D.
Director
National Eye Institute
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 30, 2007
7 PM

"Good Pain, Bad Pain: New Advances in Pain Mechanisms and Treatments"
Speaker: Michael J. Iadarola, Ph.D.
Chief, Neurobiology and Pain Therapeutics Section
Laboratory of Sensory Biology
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
 

About the Lectures

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"Alcohol Use Disorders: Old Insights, New Treatments"
Seventeen million people in the U.S.—about 1 in every 12 adults—abuse alcohol or are alcohol dependent. Alcoholism is a disease, and research shows that the risk for developing alcoholism runs in families. The genes a person inherits partially explain this pattern, but lifestyle is also a factor. The craving that an alcoholic feels for alcohol can be as strong as the need for food or water. Despite serious family, health or legal problems, an alcoholic will continue to drink. This lecture will cover alcoholism, its symptoms and the latest research on the disease.

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"The Prevention of Cervical Cancer by Vaccination and Other Means"
Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women worldwide. Although detection by Pap smear has made a substantial impact on the incidence of this disease, FDA’s approval of a new human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) in June 2006 represents an enormous advance for public health. While most HPV infections do not lead to cancer, virtually all cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV infection, and two of the HPV types targeted by the vaccine cause about 70 percent of cervical cancer cases worldwide. This lecture will include an overview of cervical cancer prevention strategies, including use of the HPV vaccine and Pap smear.

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"From Childhood Blindness to Age-related Macular Degeneration: Genes, Eye Disease, and Prospects for Therapy"
Nearly 450 genes lead to vision loss. Gene transfer and cell transplantation are among the new treatments that can benefit people with eye disease. This lecture will describe the range of eye-related genetic diseases and will explore cutting-edge eye disease treatments.

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"Good Pain, Bad Pain: New Advances in Pain Mechanisms and Treatments"
There are about 500,000 cancer deaths a year. Of those, about 50,000 people die without ever receiving adequate relief from the excruciating pain caused by the disease. Dr. Iadarola will discuss the development of a novel pain therapy that selectively kills pain-causing cells while leaving other sensory neurons intact. This results in permanent pain relief without the debilitating side effects of traditional pain-killing medications. Experiments in the laboratory and in animals have been successful, and testing in humans will begin soon. Dr. Iadarola will also discuss the basis and diagnosis of pain and the history of pain treatment.

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About the Speakers

Markus Heilig, M.D., Ph.D.
Douglas Lowy, M.D.
Paul Sieving, M.D., Ph.D.
Michael J. Iadarola, Ph.D.

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Past lectures:

2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

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Directions to the Lecture Series

NIH Security
All visitor vehicles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors will be asked to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID — driver’s license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Arrive 30 minutes before the lecture to allow extra time for this vehicle inspection procedure. You will be issued a visitor badge. Be sure to wear your visitor badge at all times while on campus.

Visitors are encouraged to use the Metrorail subway system, which has a convenient stop (Medical Center) on the NIH campus. Visit the "Metro" site for information on fares and schedules http://www.wmata.com/.

Taking the Metrorail
Take Metro’s Red Line to the Medical Center Station. The station’s escalators come out on the NIH campus. To get to Building 10, walk from the top of the escalators past the bus stops down South Drive. Cross the street and veer right onto Center Drive (past the Anchor). Remain on Center Drive as it veers left and uphill. The NIH Clinical Center (Building 10) is at the top of the hill on the left side of Center Drive.

Driving Directions
From Baltimore and All Points North of Washington, DC
Take I-95 south toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head west toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. At the fifth traffic light, turn right onto South Drive.

From Virginia and All Points South of Washington, DC
Take I-95 north toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head north toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. At the fifth traffic light, turn right onto South Drive.

Visitor Parking
Medicine for the Public attendees may park in lot 10-H just outside the south entrance to Building 10 after 6 pm. Enter the campus at South Drive and Rockville Pike. Continue on South Drive and veer left on Lincoln Drive. Take first right. Turn right into parking lot 10-H. Enter the building at the south entrance and proceed to Masur Auditorium. Attached is MFP parking map PDF Logo

NOTE: PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader.

Page last updated: February 3, 2008


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