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About the Lectures

About the Speakers

Past Lectures


Medicine for the Public: 2006 Lecture Series

. . .topics of current relevance presented by NIH researchers

•Why do only ten percent of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop tuberculosis?

•What role does the brain play in overeating?

•Why is depression twice as common in women as men?

These and other leading-edge medical issues will be discussed at the 2006 Medicine for the Public lecture series. Physician-scientists working to translate science into medicine will deliver lectures and take questions from the audience.

Medicine for the Public is a series of lectures on disease topics by NIH scientists sponsored by the NIH Clinical Center. Presented every fall since 1978, the series was developed as a means of reaching out to the general public with information on medical research. These free, public talks are designed to help non-scientists understand medical science and appreciate the importance of medical research in our lives.

For additional information on the Medicine for the Public series, call Clinical Center Communications, 301-496-2563

Tuesday, September 26
7PM

"Preventing the Nation's Leading Cause of Death: Heart Disease"
Speaker: Denise Simons-Morton, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
Director, Clinical Applications and Prevention Program
Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 3, 2006
7PM

"Stroke Update"
Speaker: Steven Warach, M.D., Ph.D.
Chief, Stroke Diagnostics and Therapeutics Section
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
7PM

"Tuberculosis in the 21st Century: Old problem, New Understanding"
Speaker: Steven M. Holland, M.D.
Chief, Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 17, 2006
7 PM

"The Role of the Gut, Hormones and the Brain in Obesity"
Speaker: Monica C. Skarulis, M.D.
Chief, Clinical Endocrine Section
Clinical Endocrinology Branch
National Institute of Diabetes, and Digestive, and Kidney Diseases
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 24, 2006
7 PM

"AIDS After 25 Years: Lessons Learned For Other Emerging Infections"
Speaker: Henry Masur, M.D.
Chief, Critical Care Medicine Department
Clinical Center
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
Tuesday, October 31, 2006
7 PM

"Depression: Impact, Causes, and Current Research"
Speaker: Peter Schmidt, M.D.
Chief, Unit on Reproductive Endocrine Studies
Behavioral Endocrinology Branch
National Institute of Mental Health
National Institutes of Health
About the Lecture | About the Speaker
Real View Lecture (Requires RealPlayer software and high-speed internet connection.)
 

About the Lectures

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"Preventing the Nation’s Leading Cause of Death: Heart Disease "
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, with about 650 thousand deaths a year. In addition, about 22 million adults in the U.S. live with heart disease. This lecture will cover factors that increase the risk of getting heart disease and what can be done to can reduce, prevent, and improve its outcome.

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"Stroke Update"
More than 700 thousand Americans have a new or recurrent stroke each year. Understanding the human brain--the body’s most complex organ--continues to be a challenge for stroke research. This lecture will include an overview of the causes of stroke, symptoms, and research for new stroke treatments.

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"Tuberculosis in the 21st Century: Old problem, New Understanding"
Tuberculosis is a worldwide health problem with an estimated 8.8 million new cases in 2003 and approximately 2 million deaths a year. Underlying medical conditions may increase TB risk, such as HIV infection, diabetes, and renal failure. Dr. Holland will explain why some people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop this disease while others don’t, how it is detected, current treatment options, and new research directions.

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"The Role of the Gut, Hormones and the Brain in Obesity"
Sixty-five percent of the US population carries extra weight; 31 percent (61 million) are considered obese. The list of medical maladies associated with obesity is long, and obese people have a shorter life expectancy than lean individuals. This lecture will discuss how research is unraveling the complex networks controlling eating behavior, as well as the importance of exercise and sleep on weight control.

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"AIDS After 25 Years: Lessons Learned For Other Emerging Infections"
When AIDS swept the nation 25 years ago, the population panicked. Scientists were pressured to approve drugs quickly. They had to battle public perceptions while trying to follow the painstaking scientific process of gathering data and developing treatments. Dr. Masur will explain how those experiences are shaping how scientists will deal with new emerging infections, such as bird flu, SARS and West Nile virus.

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"Depression: Impact, Causes, and Current Research"
Depression is a leading cause of disease-related disability worldwide and is twice as common in women as in men. Not only is depression associated with significant emotional distress, but it also confers an increased risk for several other illnesses. Dr. Schmidt will describe recent efforts to identify the underlying biology of depression, its relevance to women’s health, and potential new therapies.

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About the Speakers

Denise Simons-Morton, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
Steven Warach, M.D., Ph.D.
Steven M. Holland, M.D.
Monica C. Skarulis, M.D.
Peter Schmidt, M.D.
Henry Masur, M.D.

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Past lectures:

2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

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Directions to the Lecture Series

NIH Security
All visitor vehicles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors will be asked to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID — driver’s license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Arrive 30 minutes before the lecture to allow extra time for this vehicle inspection procedure. You will be issued a visitor badge. Be sure to wear your visitor badge at all times while on campus.

Visitors are encouraged to use the Metrorail subway system, which has a convenient stop (Medical Center) on the NIH campus. Visit the "Metro" site for information on fares and schedules http://www.wmata.com/.

Taking the Metrorail
Take Metro’s Red Line to the Medical Center Station. The station’s escalators come out on the NIH campus. To get to Building 10, walk from the top of the escalators past the bus stops down South Drive. Cross the street and veer right onto Center Drive (past the Anchor). Remain on Center Drive as it veers left and uphill. The NIH Clinical Center (Building 10) is at the top of the hill on the left side of Center Drive.

Driving Directions
From Baltimore and All Points North of Washington, DC
Take I-95 south toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head west toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. At the fifth traffic light, turn right onto South Drive.

From Virginia and All Points South of Washington, DC
Take I-95 north toward Washington, DC. At I-495 (Capital Beltway), head north toward Silver Spring/Bethesda. From the Beltway (I-495), take Exit 34, which is Rt. 355 (Wisconsin Ave./Rockville Pike), and head south toward Washington/Bethesda. At the fifth traffic light, turn right onto South Drive.

Visitor Parking
Medicine for the Public attendees may park in lot 10-H just outside the south entrance to Building 10 after 6 pm. Enter the campus at South Drive and Rockville Pike. Continue on South Drive and veer left on Lincoln Drive. Take first right. Turn right into parking lot 10-H. Enter the building at the south entrance and proceed to Masur Auditorium.

Lot 10-H will not be available on Oct. 17. On that date, attendees may park in multi-parking level garage 9 after 6 pm. Enter the campus at South Drive and Rockville Pike. Continue on South Drive and veer left on Lincoln Drive. Turn right on Convent Drive. Turn right into multi-level garage. Follow signs to Masur Auditorium.

Page last updated: May 23, 2008


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