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Radiology and Imaging Sciences
Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI)

In The News

The Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI) is a cooperative initiative between Radiology and Imaging Sciences at the NIH Clinical Center and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). CIDI was established in 2009 to perform basic science, translational, and clinical research on the imaging features of infectious disease, including CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, ultrasound, radiography, and optical modalities. These efforts comprise a new initiative at NIH to advance the knowledge of radiology-pathology-virology correlation with clinical translation in the study of infectious disease and emerging pathogens. CIDI offers opportunities for intramural NIH and extramural investigators to collaborate on infectious disease research using advanced imaging technologies.

Major CIDI Program components include:

  • Clinical research on emerging pathogens, epidemics, and pandemics for improving the role of radiology in diagnosis and treatment
  • Interdisciplinary training and education on molecular imaging applied to infectious disease research
  • Animal model research for investigating pathophysiology, innovative imaging techniques, and development of drugs and vaccines
  • Quantitative and computer-assisted-detection method development for assessing infectious disease severity and response to therapy
  • Collaborative partnerships with advanced containment laboratories with imaging capability at NIH campuses, including Fort Detrick, Bethesda, and Poolesville

The Center for Infectious Disease Imaging also provides a forum for regular dialog between radiologic and infectious disease researchers for new research design, clinical consultation, and medical education. Research fellows, post-docs, students, and visiting scholars are invited to participate in CIDI. The Co-Directors for CIDI are Dr. David Bluemke and Dr. Cliff Lane, and the Deputy Director of CIDI is Dr. Daniel Mollura. Applications for post-doctorate and research positions may be submitted at Daniel.Mollura@nih.gov.

Slide of 4 CT scans. See caption for more.

Illustration of a cell. See caption for more.

Graphic shows examples of research from CIDI, including four CT scans of individuals with novel H1N1 influenza during the 2009 pandemic, demonstrating ground glass opacities and consolidations representing active sites of disease.
View Larger Graphic (100 KB)

Graphic shows an illustration of a cell with possible targets for molecular probes in potentially researching and diagnosing infectious disease.  Commonly researched targets are shown, such as cell receptors, enzyme modified radiotracers, and theoretical probes for binding amino acids and genetic material.
View Larger Graphic (86 KB)

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Scientists and Physicians working on CIDI related initiatives include (shown alphabetically):

  • David A. Bluemke, MD, PhD, MsB, FAHA, FACR, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences

  • Mike Bray, MD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)

  • Jesus Caban, PhD, National Library of Medicine (NML)

  • Les Folio, DO, MPH, MSc (Rad), MAS, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences

  • Dima Hammoud, MD, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences

  • Peter Jahrling, PhD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), Integrated Research Facility (IRF)

  • Colleen Jonsson, PhD, University of Louisville, Center for Predictive Medicine

  • Cliff Lane, MD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)

  • Daniel J. Mollura, MD, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences

  • David M. Morens, MD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)

  • Ronald M. Summers, MD, PhD, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences

  • Jeffery K. Taubenberger, MD, PhD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID)

  • Tara Palmore, MD, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID), NIH Clinical Center

  • Anthony F. Suffredini, MD, NIH Clinical Center, Critical Care Medicine Department

  • Jianhua (Jack) Yao, PhD, NIH Clinical Center, Radiology and Imaging Sciences


Infectious Disease: A world-wide problem

Infectious diseases

Annual deaths (million)

Respiratory infections

3.96

Infectious diseases are responsible for more than 25% of 57 million annual deaths worldwide 

2/3 of 9 million pediatric deaths yearly are from infectious disease

HIV/AIDS

2.77

Diarrheal diseases

1.80

Tuberculosis

1.56

Vaccine-preventable childhood Diseases

1.12

Malaria

1.27

STDs (other than HIV)

0.18

Meningitis

0.17

Hepatitis B and C

0.16

Tropical parasitic diseases

0.13

Dengue

0.02

Other infectious diseases

1.76

Source:  World Health Organization and Morens DM, et al. The challenge of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, Nature 2004; 8: 242-249.

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Molecular Imaging of Infectious Diseases: Current Status and Future Challenges


September 21, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
The Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI/Clinical Center/NIH), the Integrated Research Facility (IRF/NIAID/NIH) and the Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research (Ci3R/ Johns Hopkins University) are co-organizing a one day symposium entitled "Molecular Imaging of Infectious Diseases: Current Status and Future Challenges", which will be held on September 21st, 2012, at the Natcher Conference Center in Bethesda, MD.

This daylong symposium will showcase the latest developments in the field of Infectious Disease Imaging and will feature multiple speakers with cross disciplinary expertise from all around the country (agenda attached) with a focus on how imaging tools can be applied in the fields of Infection and Inflammation Imaging.

This symposium is FREE to attend. However space is limited so if you are planning on attending, please RSVP at:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MolecularImagingOfInfectiousDiseases

Molecular Imaging for Infectious Diseases and Inflammation is a new and upcoming field. It is therefore an exciting time to get involved. We hope to see you on September 21st!

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This page last reviewed on 07/9/14



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